Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews

Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Designing an effective organisational architecture for an undertaking can be considered essential to its success. The way an organisation is designed – or otherwise appears to its workers – will affect the extent to which those workers associated with it can be effective at their jobs. This chapter undertakes a case study using Big Data from a project called “QPress” that was run by an organisation that is based around contingent working and inter-professionalism. Important things drawn from the data collected from the study include the importance of the Cloud to distance working, such as teleworking; the identity of the organisation and how workers relate to it; as well as what factors assist or inhibit worker motivation. The study concludes that the organisational structure of the organisation investigated – where different firms perform different tasks could be seen as best practice in supporting inter-professional environments.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews. The International Conference on Information and Knowledge Engineering (IKE’15).

Organisational Architecture and Learning in an Inter-Professional Context: A Case-Study of an Agile Crowd-Funded Software Project Using Contingent Working

Organisational Architecture and Learning in an Inter-Professional Context: A Case-Study of an Agile Crowd-Funded Software Project Using Contingent Working

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Designing an effective organisational architecture for an undertaking can be considered essential to its success. The way an organisation is designed – or otherwise appears to its workers – will affect the extent to which those workers associated with it can be effective at their jobs. This chapter undertakes a case study into an organisation that is based around contingent working and inter-professionalism. Important things drawn from the study include the importance of the Cloud to distance working, such as teleworking; the identity of the organisation and how workers relate to it; as well as what factors assist on inhibit worker motivation. The study concludes that the organisational structure of the organisation investigated – where different firms perform different tasks, could be seen as best practice in supporting inter-professional environments.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). Organisational Architecture and Learning in an Inter-Professional Context: A Case-Study of an Agile Crowd-Funded Software Project Using Contingent Working. In G. Jamil, J. Poças-Rascão, F. Ribeiro, & A. Malheiro da Silva (Eds.) Handbook of Research on Information Architecture and Management in Modern Organizations. IGI Global, Hershey, PA (Pages 274-291)

A Learning Organisation Approach to Software Project Management: Promoting Knowledge Transformation and Interprofessionalism through Crowd-Funded Agile Development

A Learning Organisation Approach to Software Project Management: Promoting Knowledge Transformation and Interprofessionalism through Crowd-Funded Agile Development

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter explores how a learning organisation differs from a teaching organisation, such as that each person holds responsibility for their own learning, yet are supported and guided by those who wish to help them further their personal development. This chapter aims to develop a software project management methodology, based on existing approaches, which can accommodate all people, regardless of ability. The model developed, called the C2-Tech-S2 approach, is specifically designed for projects that use crowd-funding and agile development, particularly in environments based around the Cloud. A pilot study is carried out to demonstrate the ‘technology’ stage of this model for assessment using the ‘support’ stage. This finds that all stages of the model need to be applied in a project, because on their own the stages may not produce the most effective outcomes in terms of increased participation.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). A Learning Organisation Approach to Software Project Management: Promoting Knowledge Transformation and Interprofessionalism through Crowd-Funded Agile Development. In A. Singh (Ed.), Achieving Enterprise Agility through Innovative Software Development. IGI Global, Hershey, PA (Pages 115-140). Available online at: http://www.jonathanbishop.com/Library/Documents/EN/docIGIPaper_C2TechS2.pdf

The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers

The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter using an empirical data-driven approach to investigate crime recording logs of South Wales Police relating to Internet trolling by and towards different sexes. The chapter finds more favourable attitudes towards women as victims in even the most trivial of cases. It finds male victims of trolling are only treated as victims when a form of unwanted face-to-face encounter is needed for action. The chapter shows transferring police powers to local authorities, can cut the cost of community policing by 50% across the board and eliminate sexist attitudes also. The chapter finds that the way social media platforms are exercising ‘sysop prerogative’ where they have no right to – such as not passing over account information on alleged defamers – puts a huge burden on police resources. Using local authorities, which have many of the same powers as the police and indeed more, can resolve problems without the need to criminalise offenders.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers. In P. Thomas, M. Srihari, & S. Kaur (Eds.) Handbook of Research on Cultural and Economic Impacts of the Information Society (pp. 67-91), IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-thin-blue-web-police-crime-records-of-internet-trolling-show-chivalrous-attitudes-that-can-be-resolved-through-transfer-of-powers.pdf

Private Lives or Public Property?: The impact of the Leveson Inquiry on Internet security and privacy in the European Union

Private Lives or Public Property?: The impact of the Leveson Inquiry on Internet security and privacy in the European Union

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The biggest story in the newspapers of 2012 probably made it into the Leveson Inquiry. This celebrity infested public inquiry intended to be the basis on which the press would be reformed to perform its role as information sources that scrutinise those with power more effectively. Leveson considered issues such as phone hacking and the distribution of private information online. The law is less clear since the publication of the Leveson Inquiry. This paper, therefore, explores the role that European Union law in the areas of property and privacy has on the way the media operates to affect security and privacy. This is achieved through exploring the data security and privacy issues surrounding the British Royal Family, where such issues came to the forefront following the exposure of explicit photographs of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, William Wales and Kate Middleton, and also those of Harry Wales.

Cyber-stalking or just plain talking?: Linguistic properties of rape-threat messages reflect underlying compulsive behaviours

Cyber-stalking or just plain talking?: Investigating the linguistic properties of rape-threat messages as compulsive behaviours

Mark Beech and Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Rape call-out trolling, more commonly known as ‘rape-threat trolling,’ occurs when a person using a communication network sends a message relating to them ‘raping’ that person. Whilst this may disgust many people, this chapter finds that not all instances of rape call-out trolling is done to cause a person apprehension. The chapter finds that many Twitter users make rape threats to their friends in an affectionate way, and so appreciating the context of rape-threat messages is essential. The most notable targets of rape call-out trolling, Caroline Criado-Perez and Stella Creasy, were targeted following calling for less men to appear on British banknotes. These two findings have implications for public policy makers who are quite happy to see people go to jail for posting rape-threats when they were drunk, namely Isabella Sorley. The chapter concludes the context around rape-threat postings needs more consideration to determine what the core meanings are.

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Reference

Mark Beech and Jonathan Bishop (2015). Cyber-stalking or just plain talking?: Linguistic properties of rape-threat messages reflect underlying compulsive behaviours. In: Jonathan Bishop (Ed.) Psychological and Social Issues Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/cyber-stalking-or-just-plain-talking-investigating-the-linguistic-priperities-of-rape-threat-messages-as-compulsive-behavours.pdf

Godliness next to Anonymous: Anti-establishment rhetoric in Robin Hood ballads and contemporary media texts

Godliness next to Anonymous: Anti-establishment rhetoric in Robin Hood ballads and contemporary media texts

Jonathan Bishop

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Godliness next to Anonymous: Anti-establishment rhetoric in Robin Hood ballads and contemporary media texts. The International Association of Robin Hood Studies (IARHS’2015) Conference. University Centre, Doncaster.