Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews

Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Designing an effective organisational architecture for an undertaking can be considered essential to its success. The way an organisation is designed – or otherwise appears to its workers – will affect the extent to which those workers associated with it can be effective at their jobs. This chapter undertakes a case study using Big Data from a project called “QPress” that was run by an organisation that is based around contingent working and inter-professionalism. Important things drawn from the data collected from the study include the importance of the Cloud to distance working, such as teleworking; the identity of the organisation and how workers relate to it; as well as what factors assist or inhibit worker motivation. The study concludes that the organisational structure of the organisation investigated – where different firms perform different tasks could be seen as best practice in supporting inter-professional environments.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews. The International Conference on Information and Knowledge Engineering (IKE’15).

The Role of Geo-Demographic Big Data for Assessing the Effectiveness of Crowd-Funded Software Projects: A Case Example of “QPress”

The Role of Geo-Demographic Big Data for Assessing the Effectiveness of Crowd-Funded Software Projects: A Case Example of “QPress”

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The current phenomenon of Big Data – the use of datasets that are too big for traditional business analysis tools used in industry – is driving a shift in how social and economic problems are understood and analysed. This chapter explores the role Big Data can play in analysing the effectiveness of crowd-funding projects, using the data from such a project, which aimed to fund the development of a software plug-in called ‘QPress’. Data analysed included the website metrics of impressions, clicks and average position, which were found to be significantly connected with geographical factors using an ANOVA. These were combined with other country data to perform t-tests in order to form a geo-demographic understanding of those who are displayed advertisements inviting participation in crowd-funding. The chapter concludes that there are a number of interacting variables and that for Big Data studies to be effective, their amalgamation with other data sources, including linked data, is essential to providing an overall picture of the social phenomenon being studied.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Role of Geo-Demographic Big Data for Assessing the Effectiveness of Crowd-Funded Software Projects: A Case Example of “QPress.” In B. Bozkaya, & V. Singh (Eds.) Geo-Intelligence and Visualization through Big Data Trends (pp. 94-120). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-geo-demographic-big-data-for-assessing-the-effectiveness-of-crowd-funded-software-projects-a-case-example-of-qpress.pdf

Organisational Architecture and Learning in an Inter-Professional Context: A Case-Study of an Agile Crowd-Funded Software Project Using Contingent Working

Organisational Architecture and Learning in an Inter-Professional Context: A Case-Study of an Agile Crowd-Funded Software Project Using Contingent Working

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Designing an effective organisational architecture for an undertaking can be considered essential to its success. The way an organisation is designed – or otherwise appears to its workers – will affect the extent to which those workers associated with it can be effective at their jobs. This chapter undertakes a case study into an organisation that is based around contingent working and inter-professionalism. Important things drawn from the study include the importance of the Cloud to distance working, such as teleworking; the identity of the organisation and how workers relate to it; as well as what factors assist on inhibit worker motivation. The study concludes that the organisational structure of the organisation investigated – where different firms perform different tasks, could be seen as best practice in supporting inter-professional environments.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). Organisational Architecture and Learning in an Inter-Professional Context: A Case-Study of an Agile Crowd-Funded Software Project Using Contingent Working. In G. Jamil, J. Poças-Rascão, F. Ribeiro, & A. Malheiro da Silva (Eds.) Handbook of Research on Information Architecture and Management in Modern Organizations. IGI Global, Hershey, PA (Pages 274-291)

Crowdfunding WordPress plugins – The case of QPress

Crowdfunding WordPress plugins – The case of QPress

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

I have been conducting research into crowd-funding of WordPress plugins, which has resulted in many publications. This talk would present a case study of the crowd-funding of QPress, an almost complete WordPress plugin. The study has looked at various geographical factors in the advertising of crowd-funded projects, finding that advertising should be fixed to locations where clicks on adverts are not done to raise funds for the websites they are displayed on. It finds clearly that crowd funded projects need to be agile – built in several stages – and involve contingent working – where people only work on it when funds exist.

Presentation

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Crowdfunding WordPress plugins – The case of QPress. WordCamp Birmingham. 8 February 2015.

QPress WordPress Plugin

QPress-wordpress-plugin-ad

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