An evaluation of social media use in a golf club

An evaluation of social media use in a golf club

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This article looks at the social media strategy used in a golf club, namely Pontypridd Golf Club. It compares what it was like prior to the advent of social media and afterwards. It does this through interviewing one of the club’s former golf captains, who was involved on both occasions. The study finds that one of the factors most affecting whether the golf club took up social media was the skill of the officers that ran the club. It was expected that a technology office would exist in order to update the website. It was not expected that officers with a particular portfolio would update the parts of the website within their own remit. Understandably, systems like WordPress were deemed complex, but even Facebook was updated by an individual rather than the officers concerned. The study concludes that increasing digital literacy will be essential to making social media use common in golf clubs and potentially any social or recreational group

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2016). An evaluation of social media use in a golf club. The 17th International Conference on Internet Computing and Internet of Things (ICOMP’16), 25-28 July 2016, Las Vegas, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/social-media-use-in-a-golf-club.pdf

The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect?

The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect?

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Robin Hood legends have spread throughout the world in many different centuries, perhaps even more so in the 20th and 21st centuries due to the Internet. The Robin Hood Character Test, which spread around offices in paper format in the 1980s has seen a resurgence in the 21st century due to its posting to personality websites and weblogs. The test claims to be able to accurately predict someone’s personality though asking them to place the characters in the story they are asked to read in the order they most value their behaviour. This study finds that the perceived accuracy of this test can be put down to the Farer Effect and also finds that the Forer Effect is more apparent when the test is conducted online than when it is conducted on paper.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect? International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

Trolls Just Want To Have Fun: Electronic Aggression within the Context of e-Participation and Other Online Political Behaviour in the United Kingdom

Trolls Just Want To Have Fun: Electronic Aggression within the Context of e-Participation and Other Online Political Behaviour in the United Kingdom

Shefali Virkar

Abstract

Over the last two decades, public confidence and trust in Government has declined visibly in several Western liberal democracies owing to a distinct lack of opportunities for citizen participation in political processes; and has instead given way instead to disillusionment with current political institutions, actors, and practices. The rise of the Internet as a global communications medium and the advent of digital platforms has opened up huge opportunities and raised new challenges for public institutions and agencies, with digital technology creating new forms of community; empowering citizens and reforming existing power structures in a way that has rendered obsolete or inappropriate many of the tools and processes of traditional democratic politics. Through an analysis of the No. 10 Downing Street ePetitions Initiative based in the United Kingdom, this article seeks to engage with issues related to the innovative use of network technology by Government to involve citizens in policy processes within existing democratic frameworks in order to improve administration, to reform democratic processes, and to renew citizen trust in institutions of governance. In particular, the work seeks to examine whether the application of the new Information and Communication Technologies to participatory democracy in the Government 2.0 era would eventually lead to radical transformations in government functioning, policymaking, and the body politic, or merely to modest, unspectacular political reform and to the emergence of technology-based, obsessive-compulsive pathologies and Internet-based trolling behaviours amongst individuals in society.

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Reference

Shefali Virkar (2014). Trolls Just Want to Have Fun: Electronic Aggression Within the Context of e-Participation and Other Online Political Behaviour in the United Kingdom’, International Journal of E-Politics (Special Issue), Volume 5, Issue 4, pp. 20-50.

Dealing with Internet Trolling in Political Online Communities: Towards the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale

Dealing with Internet Trolling in Political Online Communities: Towards the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling has become a popularly used term to describe the posting of any content on the Internet which is provocative or offensive. This is different from the original meaning online in the 1990s, which referred to the posting of provocative messages for humourous effect. Those systems operators (sysops) who run online communities are finding they are being targeted because of abuse posted on their platforms. Political discussion groups are some of the most prone to trolling, whether consensual or unwanted. Many such websites ara open for anyone to join, meaning when some members post messages they know are offensive but legal, others might find grossly offensive, meaning these messages could be illegal. This paper develops a questionnaire called the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale (TIWWCHNT-20), which aims to help sysops better plan the development of online communities to take account of different users’ capacity to be offended, and for users to self-assess whether they will be suited to an online community. The scale is discussed in relation to different Internet posting techniques where different users will act differently.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Dealing with Internet Trolling in Political Online Communities: Towards the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale. International Journal of E-Politics 5(4), 1-20. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/dealing-with-internet-trolling-in-political-online-communities-towards-the-this-is-why-we-cant-have-nice-things-scale.pdf

Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community

Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community

Jonathan Bishop and Lisa Mannay

Abstract

Wales is the “land of the poets so soothing to me,” according to its national anthem. The political and economic landscape does not on the whole provide for the many creative people that are in Welsh communities. Social media websites like MySpace and YouTube as well as websites like MTV.com, eJay and PeopleSound whilst providing space for artists to share their works, but do not usually consider the needs of local markets, such as in relation to Welsh language provision through to acknowledgement of Welsh place names and Wales’s status as a country. The study finds that there are distinct issues in relation to presenting information via the Web or Tablet based devises and suggests some of the considerations needing when designing.

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References

Jonathan Bishop & Lisa Mannay (2014). Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community. In: J. Bishop (Ed). Transforming Politics and Policy in the Digital Age. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/using-the-internet-to-make-local-music-more-available-to-the-south-wales-community.pdf

Mum’s the WordPress: A Comparative Analysis of Political and Mommy Bloggers

Mum’s the WordPress: A Comparative Analysis of Political and Mommy Bloggers

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This research paper presents findings into the differences between two types of popular bloggers: the political blogger and the mommy blogger. These terms are recent entries to the lexicon of online communities, but are soon becoming distinct concepts. This paper shows that mommy bloggers rarely discuss the issues mainly associated with political bloggers, although the reverse is not always true. While political bloggers talk about family issues, this often has little to do with calling for their rights, but echoing sentiments relating to the family life of political public figures.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2011). Mum’s the WordPress: A Comparative Analysis of Political and Mommy Bloggers. In Hamid R. Arabnia; Victor A. Clincy & Ashu M. G. Solo (Eds.) Proceedings of The 2011 Internet Conference on Internet Computing (ICOMP’2011). July 18-21, 2011. Las Vegas Nevada, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/mums-the-wordpress-a-comparative-analysis-of-political-and-mommy-bloggers.pdf

The Psychology of how Christ created Faith and Social Change: Implications for the design of E-Learning Systems

The Psychology of how Christ created Faith and Social Change: Implications for the design of E-Learning Systems

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Social change in organic and virtual communities is achieved through actors experiencing desires to carry out an action and acting them out. Ecological cognition has explained how actors act in their environment through identifying five desires that an actor experiences in an environment. This paper investigates the existence of such desires in organic and virtual communities, through carrying out a case study of a popular virtual community and analysing the Scriptures and extends the model of ecological cognition to include five opposite desires. The paper identifies three sources of desires that lead to social change, which are through an actor perceiving affordances in artefacts, through picking up resonances from other actors and through picking out cognizances in their thoughts. The role of divine command in the origin of such desires is explored as is how actors deal with desires and how they validate them. Finally, guidelines for developers of virtual communities to take into account the existence of desires in developing these environments are provided.

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The Psychology of how Christ created Faith and Social Change: Implications for the design of E-Learning Sys…

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2007). The Psychology of how Christ created Faith and Social Change: Implications for the design of E-Learning Systems. Paper presented to the Second International Conference on Faith, Spirituality and Social Change, University of Winchester, 14-15 April 2007. Available online at: http://www.jonathanbishop.com/Library/Documents/EN/docFSSC2007.pdf

Social change in organic and virtual communities: An exploratory study of Bishop Desires

Social change in organic and virtual communities: An exploratory study of Bishop Desires

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Social change in organic and virtual communities is achieved through actors experiencing desires to carry out an action and acting them out. Ecological cognition has explained how actors act in their environment through identifying five desires that an actor experiences in an environment. This paper investigates the existence of such desires in organic and virtual communities, through carrying out a case study of a popular virtual community and analysing the Scriptures and extends the model of ecological cognition to include five opposite desires. The paper identifies three sources of desires that lead to social change, which are through an actor perceiving affordances in artefacts, through picking up resonances from other actors and through picking out cognizances in their thoughts. The role of divine command in the origin of such desires is explored as is how actors deal with desires and how they validate them. Finally, guidelines for developers of virtual communities to take into account the existence of desires in developing these environments are provided.

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Social change in organic and virtual communities: An exploratory study of Bishop Desires

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2006). Social change in organic and virtual communities: An exploratory study of Bishop Desires. Paper
presented to the Faith, Spirituality and Social Change Conference, University of Winchester, 8th April 2006. Available online at: http://www.jonathanbishop.com/Library/Documents/EN/docFSSC2006.pdf

Paradise lost? Primary Empathy in Online Communities of Interest and Ways of Use

Paradise lost? Primary Empathy in Online Communities of Interest and Ways of Use

Niki Lambropoulos

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to investigate the role of empathy related to the matching of the feelings of the other person in online communities of interest, connected to contribution, self-organized learning by observation in social contexts, group building, social relationships, as well as the use in HCI. In addition, active empathic groups are suggested to have revolutionary effect for eDemocracy. We are presenting results from two studies, related to the process of non-contributors’ engagement and ways members could interfere in policies and changes of their environment with the help of software-based research.

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Paradise lost? Primary Empathy in Online Communities of Interest and Ways of Use by Jonathan Bishop

Reference

Lambropoulos, N. (2005). Paradise lost? Primary Empathy in Online Communities of Interest and Ways of Use. In the Proceedings of the 1st Conference on Online Communities and Social Computing, in the 11th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2005, 22-27 July, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Published by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

User-Designer HCI Research Model for Online Communities Groupz-ware

User-Designer HCI Research Model for Online Communities Groupz-ware

Niki Lambropoulos

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to investigate the potential incorporation of methodologies and research tools in Interaction Design for online groupz-ware. As such, a strategic, methodological model for Social Systems architecture and development was elaborated based on Interaction Design so as to be aligned with the nature and the culture of naturally developed online communities. The model suggests the necessity of interaction between community managers, users as well as developers and researchers, supporting all four views and securing both usability and sociability. There are seven stages and User-Designer HCI Research Model (U-D+) deals with one research problem in each stage, as well as suggesting continuous development (+). Following the model, the first three stages are investigated. Interesting results were derived for online groupz-ware, designed for Greek teachers’ Online Learning Community. The model was still a high intensity project when this paper was written.

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User-Designer HCI Research Model for Online Communities Groupz-ware by Jonathan Bishop

Reference

Lambropoulos, N. (2005). User-Designer HCI Research Model for Online Communities Groupz-ware. In the Proceedings of the 1st Conference on Usability and Internationalization, in the 11th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2005, 22-27 July, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Published by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc (LEA)