Concerns over NATO police operation

As the Home Office announces “one of the UK’s largest-ever policing deployments” in South Wales at the 2014 NATO Summit, concerns have been raised about public safety for those wanting to protest peacefully.

POLICE THREAT: Concerns are raised that scenes like this at the G20 summit in London where police traumatize protesters will be repeated in South Wales at the 2014 NATO summit. Courtesy: Kashfi Halford
POLICE THREAT: Concerns are raised that scenes like this at the G20 summit in London where police traumatize protesters will be repeated in South Wales at the 2014 NATO summit. Courtesy: Kashfi Halford

The 2009 G20 summit in London resulted in a number of members of the public suffering trauma through being mishandled by police when trying to protest peacefully. Concerns have been raised by human rights advocates that there would be a repeat of the violence from police officers at the NATO summit in South Wales. Ashu M.G. Solo is a civil rights activist. “The police should be equipped with miniature lapel cameras to protect themselves and the people,” he said.

Questioned about the risks to the public at the NATO summit from overzealous police officers, a Home Office spokesperson said: “It is up to the police how they want to police it.”

Members of the public caught up in any violence against them by the police are advised to make a complaint via the Independent Police Complaints Commission. They can be contacted by phone at 0300 020 0096 or via their website at http://www.ipcc.gov.uk

Newport Computing students in mock Court Room drama

This week saw University of South Wales Computing students in Newport take part in the annual Computer Forensic Investigation Mock Trials.

Students were put through their paces in a mock court room scenario played out on the day by Detective Tim Williams of Gwent Hi-Tech Crime Unit. Each group of students presented to a panel and an audience of invited guests, followed by a gruelling hour long, in depth cross examination and questioning from Detective Williams.

The case studies, which include digital crimes such as cyber-terrorism, cyber-bullying, ID theft and espionage, begin with a mock crime scene. Each team is required to secure the area, extract digital artefacts and return the seized evidence to the forensics lab where they spend the entire semester analysing the evidence in order to build their case. This entire assessment, which is the final stage of their degree, is the culmination of years of hard-work and study on the part of each student.

Andy Bellamy is from the School of Computing & Mathematics at City campus. “It is so important for the students to be a part of this link and partnership between our institution and industry,” he said. “It’s this link, along with the exceptional quality and standard of training that they receive, that enhances their potential for employability.
We are very proud to have had our graduates go on to work as investigators for HMRC, Serious Fraud Squad, GCHQ, Fields Forensics and Guidance Software, to name but a few.