Private Lives or Public Property?: The impact of the Leveson Inquiry on Internet security and privacy in the European Union

Private Lives or Public Property?: The impact of the Leveson Inquiry on Internet security and privacy in the European Union

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The biggest story in the newspapers of 2012 probably made it into the Leveson Inquiry. This celebrity infested public inquiry intended to be the basis on which the press would be reformed to perform its role as information sources that scrutinise those with power more effectively. Leveson considered issues such as phone hacking and the distribution of private information online. The law is less clear since the publication of the Leveson Inquiry. This paper, therefore, explores the role that European Union law in the areas of property and privacy has on the way the media operates to affect security and privacy. This is achieved through exploring the data security and privacy issues surrounding the British Royal Family, where such issues came to the forefront following the exposure of explicit photographs of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, William Wales and Kate Middleton, and also those of Harry Wales.

Trolling Is Not Just a Art. It Is an Science: The Role of Automated Affective Content Screening in Regulating Digital Media and Reducing Risk of Trauma

Trolling Is Not Just a Art. It Is an Science: The Role of Automated Affective Content Screening in Regulating Digital Media and Reducing Risk of Trauma

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter seeks to explore the role media content ratings play in the age of “Internet trolling” and other electronic media issues like “sexting.” Using ANOVA to validate a four-factor approach to media ratings based on maturity, the chapter finds the ability of a person to withstand various media content, measured in “knol,” which is the brain’s capacity to process information, can be used to calculate media ratings. The study concludes it is feasible to have brain-computer interfaces for PCs and kiosks to test the maturity of vulnerable persons and recommend to parents/guardians or cinema managers whether or not to allow someone access to the content they wish to consume. This could mean that computer software could be programmed to automatically censor content that person is likely to be distressed or grossly offended by. Public policy issues relating to these supply-side interventions are discussed.

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Trolling Is Not Just a Art. It Is an Science: The Role of Automated Affective Content Screening in Regulating Digital Media and Reducing Risk of Trauma. In: Maria Manuela Cruz-Cunha & Irene Maria Portela (Eds.). Handbook of Research on
Digital Crime, Cyberspace Security, and Information Assurance. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/trolling-is-not-just-a-art-it-is-an-science.pdf

My Click is My Bond: The Role of Contracts, Social Proof, and Gamification for Sysops to Reduce Pseudo-Activism and Internet Trolling

My Click is My Bond: The Role of Contracts, Social Proof, and Gamification for Sysops to Reduce Pseudo-Activism and Internet Trolling

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The growth in Internet use is not only placing pressure on service providers to maintain adequate bandwidth but also the people who run the Websites that operate through them. Called systems operators, or sysops, these people face a number of different obligations arising out of the use of their computermediated communication platforms. Most notable are contracts, which nearly all Websites have, and in the case of e-commerce sites in the European Union, there are contractual terms they must have. This chapter sets out to investigate how the role contract law can both help and hinder sysops and their users. Sysop powers are limited by sysop prerogative, which is everything they can do which has not been taken away by statute or given away by contract. The chapter finds that there are a number of special considerations for sysops in how they use contracts in order that they are not open to obligations through disabled or vulnerable users being abused by others.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). My Click is My Bond: The Role of Contracts, Social Proof, and Gamification for Sysops to Reduce Pseudo-Activism and Internet Trolling. In: Jonathan Bishop (Ed.) Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational and Psychological Issues. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/my-click-is-my-bond-contracts-social-proof-gamificaiton.pdf

Representations of ‘trolls’ in mass media communication: a review of media-texts and moral panics relating to ‘internet trolling’

Representations of ‘trolls’ in mass media communication: a review of media-texts and moral panics relating to ‘internet trolling’

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

There is a general trend amongst mass media organisations around the world towards concentration of the visual, written and audio packaging and of newspapers, websites and television as channels of information. These platforms are explored in detail in this paper in relation to the moral panics around ‘internet trolling’. This paper discusses the history of trolling in the context of mass media, specifically ‘classical trolling’ and ‘Anonymous trolling’. A review of different media headlines finds that whether or not a story is portrayed in newspapers, online, or on television, the media will use a variety of ways to convey their messages. In the case of ‘trolls’, they show a darker, sinister and transgressive side of cyberspace in the form of abuse and vitriol (i.e., Anonymous trolling). The paper concludes that future research should look in detail at the different character types of internet troller and how these affect the way so called ‘trolls’ are represented in the media and the effect this has on the attitude towards young internet users and trollers in general.

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References

Bishop, Jonathan (2014). Representations of ‘trolls’ in mass media communication: A review of media-texts and moral panics relating to ‘internet trolling.’ International Journal of Web Based Communities 10(1), 7-24. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/representaitons-of-trolls-in-mass-media-communication.pdf

Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community

Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community

Jonathan Bishop and Lisa Mannay

Abstract

Wales is the “land of the poets so soothing to me,” according to its national anthem. The political and economic landscape does not on the whole provide for the many creative people that are in Welsh communities. Social media websites like MySpace and YouTube as well as websites like MTV.com, eJay and PeopleSound whilst providing space for artists to share their works, but do not usually consider the needs of local markets, such as in relation to Welsh language provision through to acknowledgement of Welsh place names and Wales’s status as a country. The study finds that there are distinct issues in relation to presenting information via the Web or Tablet based devises and suggests some of the considerations needing when designing.

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References

Jonathan Bishop & Lisa Mannay (2014). Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community. In: J. Bishop (Ed). Transforming Politics and Policy in the Digital Age. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/using-the-internet-to-make-local-music-more-available-to-the-south-wales-community.pdf

Towards a subjectively devised parametric user model for analysing and influencing behaviour online using neuroeconomics

Towards a subjectively devised parametric user model for analysing and influencing behaviour online using neuroeconomics

Jonathan Bishop and Mark MH Goode

Abstract

The quantitative-qualitative and subjectivity-objectivity debates plague research methods text-books, divide academic departments, and confuse post-modernists as to their existence. Those from the objective-quantitative camps will usually demand methods assume parametric principles from the start, such as homogeneity and normal distribution. Many of the subjective-qualitative camps will insist on looking and the individual meanings behind what someone is saying through their narratives and other discourses. The objective-quantitative camps on the other hand think anything that does not involve systematic acquisition and analysis or data cannot be valid. This chapter presents an approach to derive a parametric user model for understanding users that makes use of the premises and ideals of both these camps.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop & Mark M.H. Goode (2014). ‘Towards a subjectively devised parametric user model for analysing and influencing behaviour online using neuroeconomics‘ In: J. Bishop (Ed). Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational, and Psychological Issues. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. (Pages: 80-95). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/towards-a-subjective-parametric-user-model-for-analysing-and-inlfluencing-online-behaviour-using-neuroeconomics.pdf

The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives

The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The rise of social networking services have furthered the proliferation of online communities, transferring the power of controlling access to content from often one person who operates a system (sysop), which they would normally rely on, to them personally. With increased participation in social networking and services come new problems and issues, such as trolling, where unconstructive messages are posted to incite a reaction, and lurking, where persons refuse to participate. Methods of dealing with these abuses included defriending, which can include blocking strangers. The Gamified Flow of Persuasion model is proposed, building on work in ecological cognition and the participation continuum, the chapter shows how all of these models can collectively be used with gamification principles to increase participation in online communities through effective management of lurking, trolling, and defriending.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2014). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Education, and Psychological Issues. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2013). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Examining the Concepts, Issues, and Implications of Internet Trolling. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2012). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: H. Li (Ed.) Virtual Community Participation and Motivation: Cross-Disciplinary Theories. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Increasing membership in online communities: The five principles of managing virtual club economies

Increasing membership in online communities: The five principles of managing virtual club economies

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

It has been argued that the consumption of club goods, where access to them is excludable and non-rivalrous, requires optimal exclusion as well as inclusion. Increasing membership appears to be a particular concern for providers of online communities and in addition increasing the participation of the membership also seems to be important. This paper defines online communities as virtual club economies, as they often exist to allow their members to share club goods. The paper explores various social networking services, finding that those with the highest number of subscriptions follow the guidelines proposed in an influential book on online communities and proposes five principles of managing these virtual club economies. These require as part of a strategy for providers to know their technology, know their subject matter, know their stratum of the wider virtual economy, know their policies and know their purpose. Each of these principles is elaborated on and the paper concludes that the ultimate purpose of a virtual club economy is to maximise the availability of its club goods, such as content to meet its inward goals of sustaining its existence and providing for its membership and wider objectives that suggest a purpose to outsiders and give insiders the motivation to remain as members.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2009). Increasing membership in online communities: The five principles of managing virtual club economies. Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Internet Technologies and Applications – ITA09. Wrexham: University of Wales Press. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-membership-in-online-communities-the-five-principles-of-virtual-club-economies.pdf