Reducing Corruption and Protecting Privacy in Emerging Economies: The Potential of Neuroeconomic Gamification and Western Media Regulation in Trust Building and Economic Growth

Reducing Corruption and Protecting Privacy in Emerging Economies: The Potential of Neuroeconomic Gamification and Western Media Regulation in Trust Building and Economic Growth

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter presents a location-based affective computing system, which can assist growing emerging markets by helping them reduce crime and increase public safety when used in conjunction with CCTV. Internet systems based on location-based services have increased in availability. Social platforms such as Twitter and Facebook now employ the information on user locations to provide context to their posts, and services such as Foursquare rely on people checking into different places, often to compete with their friends and others. Location-based information, when combined with other records, such as CCTV, promotes the opportunity for a better society. People normally abused by corrupt state officials for crimes they did not commit will now have alibis, shops will be able to more effectively build trust and procure new customers through “social proof,” and other forms of corruption will be tackled such as benefit fraud and tax evasion. Trust that everyone is paying his or her fair share can develop.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2013). Reducing Corruption and Protecting Privacy in Emerging Economies: The Potential of Neuroeconomic Gamification and Western Media Regulation in Trust Building and Economic Growth. In: Bryan Christiansenand Muslum Basilgan (Eds.) Economic Behavior, Game Theory, and Technology in Emerging Markets. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. (Pages 237-249). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/reducing-corruption-and-protecting-privact-in-emerging-economies-the-potential-of-neuroeonomic-gamification-and-western-media-regulation-in-trust-building-and-economic-growth.pdf

Mixed reaction to cameras on cops

Pontypridd has possibly become the first town in the United Kingdom to have a police officer fitted with a camera. Reaction to it is mixed.

Beat manager Constable Colin Price of South Wales Police is claimed to have taken the step to achieve “lower theft and anti-social behaviour.”  The camera will be strapped around the officer’s belt to help shoppers “feel safe.”

Equality activist and cyber rights expert Jonathan Bishop said it should also help many of the vulnerable people in the town feel safe and the roll-out should be speeded up.  “When I was a town councillor in neighbouring Treforest, I heard all these stories about how drunken or vulnerable people were being manhandled by coppers and then charged under Section 5 of the Public Order Act 1986,” he said.  “This new technology should mean that police officers are more likely to act professionally, knowing they are on camera as well!”

But some residents in Pontypridd are more sceptical.  Friends of the Earth campaigner Richard Reast said the cameras will have little positive impact:  “I had my bike vandalised in Pontypridd and there are not enough CCTV cameras in the town.”

Recent events might suggest that the use of these cameras on cops is essential.  In December 2009, a police car in Washington DC was pelted with a snowball, and an officer, identified only as Det. Baylor, got out of his car and brandished his gun at the crowd.  ReasonTV’s Dan Hayes was on the scene capturing the tense confrontation between police and citizens who chanted, “Don’t bring a gun to a snowball fight!”  The video below contains strong language.

Paul Bevan, who is Head of Community Safety at the local authority that oversees Pontypridd, said the initiative should be welcomed.  “This is yet another example of how we can take advantage of state-of-the-art technology for the wider benefit of those who live in and visit Pontypridd, particularly during the festive period.”

Jonathan Bishop, who is an expert in affective computing and information security, says the cameras need to be independently monitored and use the latest emotion recognition technologies.  “These cameras, like all CCTV in my view, should be used by volunteers at Neighbourhood Watch and not law enforcement authorities with vested interests,” he said. “With the latest emotion recognition technology, it would mean these volunteers can be warned whenever the police are causing harassment, alarm, or distress to the members of the public they are supposed to be protecting.”

Civil rights activist Ashu M. G. Solo said that cameras on cops are extremely important to prevent abuses of authority.  “Cameras on cops are needed everywhere, so that those who enforce the law cannot be above the law,” Solo said.

Tackling Internet abuse in Great Britain: Towards a framework for classifying severities of ‘flame trolling’

Tackling Internet abuse in Great Britain: Towards a framework for classifying severities of ‘flame trolling’

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

While trolling has existed as a term since the 1990s and as a reality even earlier there has been an exponential increase in the prevalence of the abusive kind – ‘flame trolling’. Mistakenly the media calls these flame trollers, ‘trolls’, when in fact there are more often than not ‘Snerts’ and ‘E-Vengers’. The justice system in Great Britain has taken a sporadic approach to dealing with flame trolling, and the wide range of legislation that has existed since the 1980s has no strategic method to assign its usage on the basis of the nature of the flame trolling as its use often depends on the whim of different police forces. This paper hopes to change this. After a brief presentation of the background of Internet trolling in Great Britain and in general a new framework is presented. This allows prosecutors to easily classify flame trolling based on the facts of the case and pick the appropriate level based on the severity.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Tackling Internet abuse in Great Britain: Towards a framework for classifying severities of ‘flame trolling’. The 11th International Conference on Security and Management (SAM’12), 16-19 July 2012, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/tackling-internet-abuse-in-great-britain-towards-a-framework-for-classifying-severities-of-flame-trolling.pdf

Tough on data misuse, tough on the causes of data misuse: A review of New Labour’s approach to information security and regulating the misuse of digital information (1997-2010)

Tough on data misuse, tough on the causes of data misuse: A review of New Labour’s approach to information security and regulating the misuse of digital information (1997-2010)

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

New Labour was a description of a particular approach to government of the British Labour Party, which was in power in the United Kingdom between 1997 and 2010. While this government initially envisaged an end to the social causes of misdemeanours, its actions led to a greater number of laws on the statute books creating thousands of statutory offences. A small number of these had direct effects on the number of computer related offences that were able to be prosecuted. This paper reviews these laws, and the role of legal systems in responding to the increasing numbers of misdemeanours that are occurring in computer environments for which New Labour’s approach of creating more statutory offences has not addressed.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2010). Tough on data misuse, tough on the causes of data misuse: A review of New Labour’s approach to information security and regulating the misuse of digital information (1997-2010). International Review of Law, Computers & Technology 24(3), pp. 299-303. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/tough-on-data-misuse-tough-on-the-causes-of-data-misuse.pdf