Paper call for addiction research

Researchers and practitioners in the fields of Internet addiction and gaming addiction are being invited to respond to a call for papers for a forthcoming book on the topic.

Online community and e-learning expert Jonathan Bishop is editing a book called ‘Psychological and Social Implications Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction’ for the leading information science publisher, IGI Global, and has issued a call for papers to other academics and experts in the field to submit chapters.

Bishop has been writing and been interviewed about Internet addiction since 2006, and following the successful release his book, ‘Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational and Psychological Issues,’ he hopes to bring together those researchers with expertise on gaming addiction also.

Topics welcomed as part of this call for papers include chapters on cyber-addiction, Internet addiction, gaming addiction, gambling addiction, serious games for healthcare, e-therapy. gamification, Neknomination, captology, seductive hypermedia, persuasive technologies, affective computing, mental health issues, emotion recognition impairments, MMORPGs, MOOCs, and MUDs.

Researchers are invited to submit a proposal for a chapter in response to this call for papers via IGI Global’s website by 15 May 2014, or a full paper no later than 15 July 2014. The link for researchers to follow to respond to this call for papers is: http://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/submit/1289

Neknominate parents ‘responsibility’

Parents must take responsibility for their children’s use of the Internet, an Internet trolling and gamification expert has said.

Jonathan Bishop, who is editor of the book, Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational and Psychological Issues, was speaking in the wake of the Neknominate craze where a number of children have been caught up in the irresponsible drinking game. Nine-year-old Rhiannon Scully was one of the most recent young people to be affected, having to have her stomach pumped after taking alcohol from her parents’ drinks cabinet with the help of her sisters.

Parents have greater opportunity in this digital age to protect their children than they did when I was younger,” Bishop said. “With Internet security and parental control software, parents can restrict how often and to what extent their children can use the Internet.
It should not be for platforms like Facebook and Twitter to police their own networks, as what may be harmful for a child could be totally acceptable for an adult.
Parents are the best judge of what is suitable for their children and what is not, so learning how to use the different tools and techniques to protect their children and restrict their Internet use is better than doing nothing or banning their Internet use completely.

The mother of Rhiannon Scully disagrees. “The NekNomination videos should be banned to protect the children,” she said. “It is not appropriate for Facebook to have these videos on the site when children can access them, especially if people have died as a result. I think it is ridiculous.
In reality children as young as eight are on Facebook and they can see these videos which inspire them. Facebook should stop allowing them from being shared. As a parent it does worry us that they can see these things so easily.
While I try and monitor my daughter’s Facebook I can only delete things my daughter writes, not what she sees.

Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational and Psychological Issues

Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational and Psychological Issues

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

With the popularity and ease-of-access to internet technologies, especially social networking, a number of human-centered issues has developed including internet addiction and cyber bullying. In an effort to encourage positive behavior, it is believed that applying gaming principles to non-gaming environments through gamification can assist in improving human interaction online.

Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational, and Psychological Issues presents information and best practices for promoting positive behavior online through gamification applications in social, educational, and psychological contexts. Through up-to-date research and practical applications, educators, academicians, information technology professionals, and psychologists will gain valuable insight into human-internet interaction and a possible solution for improving the relationship between society and technology.

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational, and Psychological Issues. IGI Global, Hershey, PA.

My Click is My Bond: The Role of Contracts, Social Proof, and Gamification for Sysops to Reduce Pseudo-Activism and Internet Trolling

My Click is My Bond: The Role of Contracts, Social Proof, and Gamification for Sysops to Reduce Pseudo-Activism and Internet Trolling

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The growth in Internet use is not only placing pressure on service providers to maintain adequate bandwidth but also the people who run the Websites that operate through them. Called systems operators, or sysops, these people face a number of different obligations arising out of the use of their computermediated communication platforms. Most notable are contracts, which nearly all Websites have, and in the case of e-commerce sites in the European Union, there are contractual terms they must have. This chapter sets out to investigate how the role contract law can both help and hinder sysops and their users. Sysop powers are limited by sysop prerogative, which is everything they can do which has not been taken away by statute or given away by contract. The chapter finds that there are a number of special considerations for sysops in how they use contracts in order that they are not open to obligations through disabled or vulnerable users being abused by others.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). My Click is My Bond: The Role of Contracts, Social Proof, and Gamification for Sysops to Reduce Pseudo-Activism and Internet Trolling. In: Jonathan Bishop (Ed.) Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational and Psychological Issues. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/my-click-is-my-bond-contracts-social-proof-gamificaiton.pdf

Reducing Corruption and Protecting Privacy in Emerging Economies: The Potential of Neuroeconomic Gamification and Western Media Regulation in Trust Building and Economic Growth

Reducing Corruption and Protecting Privacy in Emerging Economies: The Potential of Neuroeconomic Gamification and Western Media Regulation in Trust Building and Economic Growth

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter presents a location-based affective computing system, which can assist growing emerging markets by helping them reduce crime and increase public safety when used in conjunction with CCTV. Internet systems based on location-based services have increased in availability. Social platforms such as Twitter and Facebook now employ the information on user locations to provide context to their posts, and services such as Foursquare rely on people checking into different places, often to compete with their friends and others. Location-based information, when combined with other records, such as CCTV, promotes the opportunity for a better society. People normally abused by corrupt state officials for crimes they did not commit will now have alibis, shops will be able to more effectively build trust and procure new customers through “social proof,” and other forms of corruption will be tackled such as benefit fraud and tax evasion. Trust that everyone is paying his or her fair share can develop.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2013). Reducing Corruption and Protecting Privacy in Emerging Economies: The Potential of Neuroeconomic Gamification and Western Media Regulation in Trust Building and Economic Growth. In: Bryan Christiansenand Muslum Basilgan (Eds.) Economic Behavior, Game Theory, and Technology in Emerging Markets. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. (Pages 237-249). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/reducing-corruption-and-protecting-privact-in-emerging-economies-the-potential-of-neuroeonomic-gamification-and-western-media-regulation-in-trust-building-and-economic-growth.pdf

Criticism over ‘cunning children’ comment

A Liberal Democrat Minister in the House of Lords has been criticised over comments where she called children ‘cunning’ in reference to the lack of awareness in their parents to know how to more carefully monitor their childrens’ technology use.

Susan Garden, Baroness Garden of Frognal
Susan Garden, Baroness Garden of Frognal pictured in Birmingham. Courtesy: Obtained from Wikipedia.

In response to a question by Labour member of the House of Lords, Baroness Massey of Darwen, about applying age restrictions to video games, Baroness Garden of Frognal said to the House: “The BBFC is indeed involved in this (media ratings). It has just become the independent reviewer of the content of mobile operators and, as the noble Lord says, there is some overlap between what goes on in the film industry and what goes on in the video games industry.
It is a question all the time of trying to keep one step ahead of cunning children, who have a tendency to be one step ahead of their parents.

Jonathan Bishop is a researcher in the areas of gamification and Digital Teens who runs the Free Digital Project (www.freedigital.org.uk) and has developed approaches to automatically assign media ratings. “It is immoral for Baroness Garden to attack young people for doing what young people do – test the limits,” he said. “Responsibility for a child’s welfare should in the first instance be with their parents or guardians.
The role of the government should be to intervene only where the market is failing, and from my point of view, Internet security software is quite advanced, and making parents aware of its availability when accessing relevant public services would be the least invasive approach.
Current legislation is strong enough to prosecute people for online offences against children, and parliamentarians would do better to support research like what I am doing at Crocels, which will make Internet security software even more advanced, so it is possible for young people to be protected without them being blamed for acting on their natural curiosities when parents are already stretched in trying to have a life for themselves also.