The Impacts of Alcohol on E-Dating Activity: Increases in Flame Trolling Corresponds with Higher Alcohol Consumption

The Impacts of Alcohol on E-Dating Activity: Increases in Flame Trolling Corresponds with Higher Alcohol Consumption

Jason Barratt and Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The impact of alcohol on Internet use is relatively unexplored. This chapter presents the results of a study conducted over a period of 1 year, which investigated whether persons who stated on their e-dating profile that they drank alcohol were more or less likely to contact another person. The study found that increased consumption of alcohol resulted in a person posting more flames (i.e. abusive posts) to their target. No such difference existed in terms of whether a person drank alcohol in relation to whether they had a low education, spoke more about themselves, their target, or whether they posted kudos to their targets. The chapter concludes that further research is needed to uncover the effects of alcohol on participation in social networking services, so that young people, like Liam Stacey and Isabella Sorley are not unfairly targeted for Internet trolling.

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Reference

Jason Barratt and Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Impacts of Alcohol on E-Dating Activity: Increases in Flame Trolling Corresponds with Higher Alcohol Consumption. In J. Bishop (Ed.), Psychological and Social Implications Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction (pp. 186-197). IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-impacts-of-alcohol-on-e-dating-activity.pdf

Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization  for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online

Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization  for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Chatroom Bobs, which derived from the concept of ‘Uncle Bob’ being a name for a less than responsible family man, are characterised by being online community users driven by seeking out satisfaction for their ‘urgeances’ (or biological drives). Some of these are akin to the ‘office loser’ who tries to impress others but is despised, others have more ulterior motives for sexual satisfaction. This paper presents an intervention – called MEDIAT – which uses TAGTeach to retrain people who are sexually damaged by society and demonstrate impairment in how they interact with others. The paper presents an equation for measuring such ‘social orientation impairment’ as a reflection of its relationship to serotonergic and dopaminergic activity in the prefrontal cortex as a result of differences in ‘Neuro-response plasticity’. The paper concludes that by using MEDIAT to reverse dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity caused by traumatic experience can lead to increased constructive participation in online and other environments.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online. In: 13th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BIOCOMP’12), 16-19 July 2012, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/taming-the-chatroom-bob-the-role-of-brain-computer-interfaces-that-manipulate-prefrontal-cortex-optimization-for-increasing-participation-of-victims-of-traumatic-sex-and-other-abuse-online.pdf

Understanding and facilitating the development of social networks in online dating communities: A Case Study and Model

Understanding and facilitating the development of social networks in online dating communities: A Case Study and Model

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Online dating is a big business, allowing people from the comfort of their own home to view and read about potential mates all around the world. Different dating sites offer different services. However, it is not yet commonplace for websites dedicated to dating to use the social networking tools used by popular online communities, such as those that use the personal homepage and message board genres. The Ecological Cognition Framework (ECF) provides a theoretical model regarding online dating communities’ behavior and relationship development. A model based on the ECF is proposed and provides a basis for developing online dating services that effectively support relationship development. Two investigations are presented in this chapter, one that uses a case study approach to identify and describe online dating services from the perspective of a specific case and another that assess the effectiveness of existing online dating services based on the guidelines developed from the case study. The case study provides a useful insight into the nature of social networking from the perspective of a specific case, which led to guidelines for developing e-dating systems that when evaluated showed that the most popular social networking services also score well against the criteria proposed in those guidelines.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2008). Understanding and facilitating the development of social networks in online dating communities: A Case Study and Model. In: C. Romm-Livermore & K. Setzekorn (eds.). Social Networking Communities and EDating Services: Concepts and Implications. IGI Global: New York. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/understanding-and-facilitating-the-development-of-social-networks-in-online-dating-communities-a-case-study-and-model.pdf