We Don’t Do Politics: An Analysis and Discussion of Information Seeking Behaviour Research in Relation to the Net Generation

We Don’t Do Politics: An Analysis and Discussion of Information Seeking Behaviour Research in Relation to the Net Generation

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Information Seeking Behaviour (ISB) is becoming an interesting topic, especially with the advancement of the World Wide Web and technologically enhanced data collection techniques. Differences between generations, such as the Net Generation and Baby Boomers are becoming more and more evident. The Net Generation have shown they are enjoying more public policy participation than ever before through the use of the Internet. Finding an overall methodology that takes into account this generation is therefore a challenge. This chapter applies a heuristic framework to a number of research papers on the Net Generation and ISBs in order to critically analyse and evaluate the information within it in order to gain an insight into the most effective approach to ISB research. Through interpreting these research papers, this chapter attempts to gauge the scope and develop an understanding of ISB research in relation to the Net Generation and discover the most effective methodological approach for the emerging discipline.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2014). We Don’t Do Politics: An Analysis and Discussion of Information Seeking Behaviour Research in Relation to the Net Generation. In J. Bishop (Ed.), Transforming Politics and Policy in the Digital Age (pp. 6-21). IGI Global, Hershey, PA.

Foreword for the special issue on Africa and social media

Foreword for the special issue on Africa and social media

Piet Kommers

Abstract

If social media are crucial in western communities they are even more vital for developing countries like in Africa. This preface preludes on the coming decades when economies become subservient to societal needs instead of “market economies” again. This editorial is worth reading as it helps you to see the next generation of social media. It is no longer sufficient to see social networking as mirroring the actual social presence; social media will take over sensitive parts of socialisation as we now see happening in the classroom. Trolling as we see it now just shows that more media-based communication will go beyond news, critics and visionary genres. It will be the natural rhetoric for citizens to express societal needs.

Full Text

Citation

Piet Kommers (2014). Foreword for the special issue on Africa and social media. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 1(1), 1-2.

Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community

Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community

Jonathan Bishop and Lisa Mannay

Abstract

Wales is the “land of the poets so soothing to me,” according to its national anthem. The political and economic landscape does not on the whole provide for the many creative people that are in Welsh communities. Social media websites like MySpace and YouTube as well as websites like MTV.com, eJay and PeopleSound whilst providing space for artists to share their works, but do not usually consider the needs of local markets, such as in relation to Welsh language provision through to acknowledgement of Welsh place names and Wales’s status as a country. The study finds that there are distinct issues in relation to presenting information via the Web or Tablet based devises and suggests some of the considerations needing when designing.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop & Lisa Mannay (2014). Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community. In: J. Bishop (Ed). Transforming Politics and Policy in the Digital Age. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/using-the-internet-to-make-local-music-more-available-to-the-south-wales-community.pdf

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter presents a case study of The Emotivate Project and the role it played in the didactic education of 11 school-age children from the former coalfields communities of Llantwit Fardre and Pontypridd in Wales in the United Kingdom through blended learning (bLearning) and blended twinning (bTwinning). The chapter shows how the Emotivate Projects provides evidence to show that UK Government’s Big Society policy depends, not on additional government intervention beyond finance, but partnerships on the basis of responsible capitalism and community co-operativism, involving all three market sectors – people, private and public. By using the capital and ‘payment in kind’ of responsible capitalist firms, in addition to charitable funding and government grants means partnerships across sectors can provide a significant degree of match funding for Big Society projects. The chapter recommends that the private sector get involved in increasing efficiency in Big Society run on a people sector basis, through taking advantage of outsourcing. This enabled them to fulfil their social or moral causes through didactic activism with better value for money due to efficiency savings in overhead costs.

Full Text

References

J. Bishop (2012). Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives. In: P.M. Pumilia-Gnarini, E, Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, L, Guerra (Eds.) Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education Incorporating Advancements. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/lessons-from-the-emotivate-project-for-increasing-take-up-of-big-society-and-responsible-capitalism-initiatives.pdf

Cooperative e-learning in the multilingual and multicultural school

Cooperative e-learning in the multilingual and multicultural school: The role of ‘Classroom 2.0’ for increasing participation in education

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Classroom 2.0 initiative is one of the most fundamental reforms to the way education is performed across the European Union. Starting its life at the Digital Classroom of Tomorrow (DCOT) Project in Wales, the initiative has shown that concepts like electronic individual education programmes (eIEPs) and the electronic twinning of schools (eTwinning) can play an important role in enhancing learning outcomes for school age learners. This chapter presents a review of the impact of the original Classroom 2.0 Project – DCOT – and explores some of the technical issues essential to the project’s success across Europe.

Full Text

References

J. Bishop (2012). Cooperative e-learning in the multilingual and multicultural school: The role of ‘Classroom 2.0’ for increasing participation in education. P.M. Pumilia-Gnarini, E, Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, L, Guerra (Eds.) Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education Incorporating Advancements. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/cooperative-e-learning-in-the-multilingual-and-multicultural-school-the-role-of-classroom-2-0.pdf

The potential of persuasive technology for educating heterogeneous user groups

The potential of persuasive technology for educating heterogeneous user groups

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Masters-level thesis presents an overview of the state of play in minority language education in Europe in 2004, and discusses ways in which e-learning systems can be adapted to take account of then emerging generations like the Net Generation, using buddy-lists and extendible and re-usable learning objects, 3 years before Facebook was launched, replacing learning objects with plug-ins.

Full Text

// ]]>

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2004). The potential of persuasive technology for educating heterogeneous user groups. Submission in Part fulfilment of the MSc in E-Learning. Pontypridd, GB: University of Glamorgan. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-potential-of-persuasive-technology-in-educating-heterogeneous-user-groups-jonathanbishop.pdf