Managing sysop prerogative in Europe through fabris dualism: An agenda for reform of the European Union and Council of Europe into international organisations

Managing sysop prerogative in Europe through fabris dualism: An agenda for reform of the European Union and Council of Europe into international organisations

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The European Union referendum on the 23 June 2016 in the United Kingdom was reported as being the most significant plebiscite for over a generation. Its impacts may only become most apparent when the citizens of the United Kingdom start to demand the same rights that those in the countries that have remained a member of the European Union enjoy. This paper looks at the impact leaving the European Union will have for the United Kingdom in terms of ‘sysop prerogative’ – the right or lack of for information society service providers to do what they want when administering their websites as systems operators, or sysops. The paper argues that a lack of harmonization of laws across Europe will make enforcing sysop prerogative and indeed the very nature of it, more difficult. Even with the outcome of the EU referendum affecting only the United Kingdom, this paper argues that in order to secure a cyberspace free from crime that global cooperation is still needed, but that the European Union in its current form might not be the appropriate vehicle at all, with a combination of the United Nations, Nato and the Council of Europe being more suitable.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). Managing sysop prerogative in Europe through fabris dualism: An agenda for reform of the European Union and Council of Europe into international organisations. The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 3(1). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/managing-sysop-prerogative-in-europe-through-fabris-dualism.pdf

Enhancing the Performance of Human Resources through E-Mentoring: The Role Of an Adaptive Hypermedia System Called “AVEUGLE”

Enhancing the Performance of Human Resources through E-Mentoring: The Role Of an Adaptive Hypermedia System Called “AVEUGLE”

Abstract

Coaching and mentoring have many commonalities but can also be seen to be different. The aim of coaching is to help people transform being where they are to where they want to go, which may be on a path that has not yet been trodden. Mentoring is a one-to-one communication between a mentor who has “been there and done that” and a mentee who wants to “learn the ropes.” This paper looks at how these practices can be enabled online through Virtual Coaches and the extent and limitations of the GROW model for online coaching and mentoring. It finds that the GROW model is limited in what it can do, and that it needs to be extended to consider factors beyond goals, realities, options, and wills. It is suggested that “engage” and “routinize” be added to create a new model called “GROWER.” An extension of the M-MARS model making it M-REAMS (i.e. Methods, Rules, Enmities, Amities, Memes, Strategies) is proposed for an ethnomethodological approach to reflective learning. The paper concludes that virtual coaches can provide benefits in terms of enhanced mentoring and coaching relationships.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). Enhancing the Performance of Human Resources through E-Mentoring: The Role Of an Adaptive Hypermedia System Called “AVEUGLE”. International Management Review 12(1), pp.1-11. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/enhancing-the-performance-of-human-resources-through-e-mentoring-the-role-of-aveugle.pdf

The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect?

The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect?

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Robin Hood legends have spread throughout the world in many different centuries, perhaps even more so in the 20th and 21st centuries due to the Internet. The Robin Hood Character Test, which spread around offices in paper format in the 1980s has seen a resurgence in the 21st century due to its posting to personality websites and weblogs. The test claims to be able to accurately predict someone’s personality though asking them to place the characters in the story they are asked to read in the order they most value their behaviour. This study finds that the perceived accuracy of this test can be put down to the Farer Effect and also finds that the Forer Effect is more apparent when the test is conducted online than when it is conducted on paper.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect? International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

Ranulf de Blondeville – First Lord of the Trolls

Ranulf de Blondeville – First Lord of the Trolls

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Ranulf de Blondeville was the 6th Earl of Chester and 1st Earl of Lincoln. He is famously referred to alongside Robin Hood in Piers Plowman. Ranulf has been portrayed as a trouble-maker with a strong independent streak. This paper compares Ranulf with contemporary Internet trolls. This involves looking at not only how Ranulf III of Chester’s activities compare with Internet trolls, but also how many of the Robin Hood legends might emanate from the activities and stories associated with this particular Ranulf Earl of Chester.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). Ranulf de Blondeville – First Lord of the Trolls. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

My name is Robin Hood: Comparing pseudonym use in crime records and popular culture during the reigns of John I, Henry III and Edward I with Cyberspace

My name is Robin Hood: Comparing pseudonym use in crime records and popular culture during the reigns of John I, Henry III and Edward I with Cyberspace

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

It is known that one of the earliest references to Robin Hood is the literary work, ‘Piers Plowman.’ For centuries scholars have tried to find out who the real Robin Hood was. At present many are willing to accept that Robin Hood was no more than a myth. Whilst this paper does not seek to disagree with that consensus, it aims to show that the use of pseudonyms during the reigns of King John I, King Henry III and Edward I, seeks as much association with this myth at this time as pseudonym use in Cyberspace does today.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). My name is Robin Hood: Comparing pseudonym use in crime records and popular culture during the reigns of John I, Henry III and Edward I with Cyberspace. The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 4(1)

The role of affective computing and multimedia forensics for proving ‘common law rape’ and ‘delict paternity’ by persistent misusers of e-dating services

The role of affective computing and multimedia forensics for proving ‘common law rape’ and ‘delict paternity’ by persistent misusers of e-dating services

Jonathan Bishop

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The role of affective computing and multimedia forensics for proving ‘common law rape’ and ‘delict paternity’ by persistent misusers of e-dating services. The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 2(2)

Foreword for the Special Issue on Anonymous

Foreword for the Special Issue on Anonymous

Niki Lambropoulos

Abstract

This special issue on Anonymous brings together and important collection of papers on the topic. To date, much information on the Anonymous movement has been retrievable only through secondary sources, like Wikipedia and newsprint. Whilst in some cases the authors have needed to refer to these, this special issue is one of the first authoritative accounts of works on Anonymous, focussing mainly on original empirical investigation into original sources such as Encyclopedia Dramatica and the synthesising of established literature.

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Citation

Niki Lambropoulos (2014). Foreword for the Special Issue on Anonymous. The International Journal of Trolling and Online Participation 1(2), pp.1-2. Available online at http://research.crocels.com/research/1569/foreword-for-the-special-issue-on-anonymous-niki-lambropoulos/

Trolls Just Want To Have Fun: Electronic Aggression within the Context of e-Participation and Other Online Political Behaviour in the United Kingdom

Trolls Just Want To Have Fun: Electronic Aggression within the Context of e-Participation and Other Online Political Behaviour in the United Kingdom

Shefali Virkar

Abstract

Over the last two decades, public confidence and trust in Government has declined visibly in several Western liberal democracies owing to a distinct lack of opportunities for citizen participation in political processes; and has instead given way instead to disillusionment with current political institutions, actors, and practices. The rise of the Internet as a global communications medium and the advent of digital platforms has opened up huge opportunities and raised new challenges for public institutions and agencies, with digital technology creating new forms of community; empowering citizens and reforming existing power structures in a way that has rendered obsolete or inappropriate many of the tools and processes of traditional democratic politics. Through an analysis of the No. 10 Downing Street ePetitions Initiative based in the United Kingdom, this article seeks to engage with issues related to the innovative use of network technology by Government to involve citizens in policy processes within existing democratic frameworks in order to improve administration, to reform democratic processes, and to renew citizen trust in institutions of governance. In particular, the work seeks to examine whether the application of the new Information and Communication Technologies to participatory democracy in the Government 2.0 era would eventually lead to radical transformations in government functioning, policymaking, and the body politic, or merely to modest, unspectacular political reform and to the emergence of technology-based, obsessive-compulsive pathologies and Internet-based trolling behaviours amongst individuals in society.

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Reference

Shefali Virkar (2014). Trolls Just Want to Have Fun: Electronic Aggression Within the Context of e-Participation and Other Online Political Behaviour in the United Kingdom’, International Journal of E-Politics (Special Issue), Volume 5, Issue 4, pp. 20-50.

Dealing with Internet Trolling in Political Online Communities: Towards the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale

Dealing with Internet Trolling in Political Online Communities: Towards the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling has become a popularly used term to describe the posting of any content on the Internet which is provocative or offensive. This is different from the original meaning online in the 1990s, which referred to the posting of provocative messages for humourous effect. Those systems operators (sysops) who run online communities are finding they are being targeted because of abuse posted on their platforms. Political discussion groups are some of the most prone to trolling, whether consensual or unwanted. Many such websites ara open for anyone to join, meaning when some members post messages they know are offensive but legal, others might find grossly offensive, meaning these messages could be illegal. This paper develops a questionnaire called the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale (TIWWCHNT-20), which aims to help sysops better plan the development of online communities to take account of different users’ capacity to be offended, and for users to self-assess whether they will be suited to an online community. The scale is discussed in relation to different Internet posting techniques where different users will act differently.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Dealing with Internet Trolling in Political Online Communities: Towards the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale. International Journal of E-Politics 5(4), 1-20. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/dealing-with-internet-trolling-in-political-online-communities-towards-the-this-is-why-we-cant-have-nice-things-scale.pdf

Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US

Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Retaliatory feedback is a significant problem on the Internet, which is not just confined to online auction websites, but other online environments dependent on reputation systems. Explored in this paper are the acts of an Internet troller who spread malicious and false allegations that the series of conferences called WORLDCOMP are “fake.” This paper interviews one of the organisers of this conference to ask how they went about dealing with the retaliatory feedback, and in particular their engagement with law enforcement agencies, such as the FBI, the police and the civil courts. To reform the UK Home Office requires learning lessons from this and the US Department of Homeland Security. This paper proposes making greater use of National Crime Agency and Police and Crime Commissioners to provide a better strategic set-up for law enforcement under the UK Home Office. It also suggest using publicly funded solicitors and community wardens, as opposed to the current set-up of police constables, to deal with community policing. The paper concludes that in order for the promise made by the New Labour Government to be “tough on crime and tough on the causes of crime” to become a reality, encouraging peaceful discourses between community members and former offenders is essential.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US. Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management 11(4), 511-531. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/transforming-the-uk-home-office-into-a-department-for-homeland-security.pdf