Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter presents a case study of The Emotivate Project and the role it played in the didactic education of 11 school-age children from the former coalfields communities of Llantwit Fardre and Pontypridd in Wales in the United Kingdom through blended learning (bLearning) and blended twinning (bTwinning). The chapter shows how the Emotivate Projects provides evidence to show that UK Government’s Big Society policy depends, not on additional government intervention beyond finance, but partnerships on the basis of responsible capitalism and community co-operativism, involving all three market sectors – people, private and public. By using the capital and ‘payment in kind’ of responsible capitalist firms, in addition to charitable funding and government grants means partnerships across sectors can provide a significant degree of match funding for Big Society projects. The chapter recommends that the private sector get involved in increasing efficiency in Big Society run on a people sector basis, through taking advantage of outsourcing. This enabled them to fulfil their social or moral causes through didactic activism with better value for money due to efficiency savings in overhead costs.

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References

J. Bishop (2012). Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives. In: P.M. Pumilia-Gnarini, E, Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, L, Guerra (Eds.) Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education Incorporating Advancements. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/lessons-from-the-emotivate-project-for-increasing-take-up-of-big-society-and-responsible-capitalism-initiatives.pdf

Cooperative e-learning in the multilingual and multicultural school

Cooperative e-learning in the multilingual and multicultural school: The role of ‘Classroom 2.0’ for increasing participation in education

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Classroom 2.0 initiative is one of the most fundamental reforms to the way education is performed across the European Union. Starting its life at the Digital Classroom of Tomorrow (DCOT) Project in Wales, the initiative has shown that concepts like electronic individual education programmes (eIEPs) and the electronic twinning of schools (eTwinning) can play an important role in enhancing learning outcomes for school age learners. This chapter presents a review of the impact of the original Classroom 2.0 Project – DCOT – and explores some of the technical issues essential to the project’s success across Europe.

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References

J. Bishop (2012). Cooperative e-learning in the multilingual and multicultural school: The role of ‘Classroom 2.0’ for increasing participation in education. P.M. Pumilia-Gnarini, E, Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, L, Guerra (Eds.) Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education Incorporating Advancements. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/cooperative-e-learning-in-the-multilingual-and-multicultural-school-the-role-of-classroom-2-0.pdf

Transformations in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster

Transformations in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster’. In: Postgraduate interdisciplinary conference on Transformations

Jonathan Bishop

References

Bishop, J. (2011). ‘Transformations in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster’. In: Postgraduate interdisciplinary conference on Transformations. Cardiff, UK: Cardiff University Press.

The role of mediating artifacts in the design of persuasive e-learning systems

The role of mediating artifacts in the design of persuasive e-learning systems

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

E-learning applications are becoming commonplace in the networked classroom, as educators search for new ways of engaging their learners. Traditional methods of designing these systems have focussed the tasks users are likely to complete as opposed to designing them to persuade the user to develop knowledge or learn about topics. Successful e-learning systems allow the user to interact with the environment using mediating artefacts, which are conductors for action within these environments. Mediating artefacts take many forms, in Internet applications they often manifest in the form of text that affords clicking, whereas in graphical environments they are often icons that afford dragging. Many e-learning systems are based around mediating artefacts, but few of these have been designed to encourage learners to carry actions in order to meet their own goals. This paper investigates how mediating artefacts can be made persuasive and suggests a scenario-based design model to aid developers in making e-learning systems persuasive and orientated around the goals of learners.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2005). The role of mediating artifacts in the design of persuasive e-learning systems. In: Proceedings of the First International Conferences on Internet Technologies and Applications, Wrexham: University of Wales Press, pp. 548. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-mediating-artifacts-in-the-design-of-persuasive-e-learning-systems.pdf

Evaluation-Centred Design of E-Learning Communities: A Case Study and Review

Evaluation-Centred Design of E-Learning Communities: A Case Study and Review

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This paper describes a proposal for a evaluation-centred design model based on use of the Star Lifecycle over a number of years in different industries. This paper outlines the five stages of a new star lifecycle, which are based on the various sectors of the e-learning industry, those being Consulting, Content, Technology, Services, and Support. The methods, tools and techniques for carrying out each of the five development stages are evaluated, with examples and practices from the development of systems in three projects, including Llantrisant Online. These practices are reviewed and modern practices, such as the use of scenarios in the design process are highlighted.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2007). Evaluation-Centred Design of E-Learning Communities: A Case Study and Review. In: V. Grout, D. Oram & R. Picking (eds.). Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Internet Technologies and Applications (ITA07 edn.). University of Wales Press: Wrexham, pp. 1-9. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/evaluation-centred-designed-of-e-learning-communities-a-case-study-and-review.pdf

Transforming Lurkers into Posters: The role of the Participation Continuum

Transforming Lurkers into Posters: The role of the Participation Continuum

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Increasing participation has long been seen as a way additional to new technology of helping online communities to grow. Online community managers may well advertise their website on other service platforms, but with up 90% of the visitors to their site being non-participants, referred to as lurkers, they could do no better than improving their website to tackle lurker fears. This paper presents the ‘participation continuum’ for understanding why some users are posters, and do participate, and why others are lurkers, and do not contribute. The paper considers lurkers as victims of the failures of those manage online communities to encourage involvement from them by combating the fears they have. The main fears of lurkers are explored and solutions for overcoming them explained and a study is presented using the participation continuum, which confirms the hypothesis of lurkers being similar to those with social phobia.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2011). Transforming Lurkers into Posters: The role of the Participation Continuum. In: In: V. Grout, R. Picking & D. Oram (Eds.) Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Internet Technologies and Applications (ITA11), 6 September 2011, Wrexham, UK: University of Wales Press. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/transforming-lurkers-into-posters-the-role-of-the-participation-continuum.pdf

Mum’s the WordPress: A Comparative Analysis of Political and Mommy Bloggers

Mum’s the WordPress: A Comparative Analysis of Political and Mommy Bloggers

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This research paper presents findings into the differences between two types of popular bloggers: the political blogger and the mommy blogger. These terms are recent entries to the lexicon of online communities, but are soon becoming distinct concepts. This paper shows that mommy bloggers rarely discuss the issues mainly associated with political bloggers, although the reverse is not always true. While political bloggers talk about family issues, this often has little to do with calling for their rights, but echoing sentiments relating to the family life of political public figures.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2011). Mum’s the WordPress: A Comparative Analysis of Political and Mommy Bloggers. In Hamid R. Arabnia; Victor A. Clincy & Ashu M. G. Solo (Eds.) Proceedings of The 2011 Internet Conference on Internet Computing (ICOMP’2011). July 18-21, 2011. Las Vegas Nevada, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/mums-the-wordpress-a-comparative-analysis-of-political-and-mommy-bloggers.pdf

Enhancing the understanding of genres of web-based communities: the role of the ecological cognition framework

Enhancing the understanding of genres of web-based communities: The role of the ecological cognition framework

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Web-based communities have been an interest of social science researchers since the dawn of the millennium. To date, much research into them has focused on the methods to enhance community building and understand those who do not participate in community life, known as lurkers. This paper explores web-based communities as a type of media, classifying types of web-based community such as message boards, chat groups and weblogs as genres. A methodology is proposed based on the Ecological Cognition Framework (ECF) for reading these web-based communities in order to determine their genre and subgenre. Utilising both quantitative and qualitative methods to assess the images, text and other artefacts in these web-based communities, two specific sub-genres of the weblogs and directories genre emerge as the political blog and the mommy blog and these are compared with the significant differences that are found between them that make them solid subgenres.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2009). Enhancing the understanding of genres of web-based communities: The role of the ecological cognition framework. International Journal of Web-Based Communities, 5(1), 4-17. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/enhancing-the-understanding-of-genres-of-web-based-communities-the-role-of-the-ecological-cognition-framework.pdf

Increasing membership in online communities: The five principles of managing virtual club economies

Increasing membership in online communities: The five principles of managing virtual club economies

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

It has been argued that the consumption of club goods, where access to them is excludable and non-rivalrous, requires optimal exclusion as well as inclusion. Increasing membership appears to be a particular concern for providers of online communities and in addition increasing the participation of the membership also seems to be important. This paper defines online communities as virtual club economies, as they often exist to allow their members to share club goods. The paper explores various social networking services, finding that those with the highest number of subscriptions follow the guidelines proposed in an influential book on online communities and proposes five principles of managing these virtual club economies. These require as part of a strategy for providers to know their technology, know their subject matter, know their stratum of the wider virtual economy, know their policies and know their purpose. Each of these principles is elaborated on and the paper concludes that the ultimate purpose of a virtual club economy is to maximise the availability of its club goods, such as content to meet its inward goals of sustaining its existence and providing for its membership and wider objectives that suggest a purpose to outsiders and give insiders the motivation to remain as members.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2009). Increasing membership in online communities: The five principles of managing virtual club economies. Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Internet Technologies and Applications – ITA09. Wrexham: University of Wales Press. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-membership-in-online-communities-the-five-principles-of-virtual-club-economies.pdf

Understanding and facilitating the development of social networks in online dating communities: A Case Study and Model

Understanding and facilitating the development of social networks in online dating communities: A Case Study and Model

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Online dating is a big business, allowing people from the comfort of their own home to view and read about potential mates all around the world. Different dating sites offer different services. However, it is not yet commonplace for websites dedicated to dating to use the social networking tools used by popular online communities, such as those that use the personal homepage and message board genres. The Ecological Cognition Framework (ECF) provides a theoretical model regarding online dating communities’ behavior and relationship development. A model based on the ECF is proposed and provides a basis for developing online dating services that effectively support relationship development. Two investigations are presented in this chapter, one that uses a case study approach to identify and describe online dating services from the perspective of a specific case and another that assess the effectiveness of existing online dating services based on the guidelines developed from the case study. The case study provides a useful insight into the nature of social networking from the perspective of a specific case, which led to guidelines for developing e-dating systems that when evaluated showed that the most popular social networking services also score well against the criteria proposed in those guidelines.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2008). Understanding and facilitating the development of social networks in online dating communities: A Case Study and Model. In: C. Romm-Livermore & K. Setzekorn (eds.). Social Networking Communities and EDating Services: Concepts and Implications. IGI Global: New York. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/understanding-and-facilitating-the-development-of-social-networks-in-online-dating-communities-a-case-study-and-model.pdf