An evaluation of social media use in a golf club

An evaluation of social media use in a golf club

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This article looks at the social media strategy used in a golf club, namely Pontypridd Golf Club. It compares what it was like prior to the advent of social media and afterwards. It does this through interviewing one of the club’s former golf captains, who was involved on both occasions. The study finds that one of the factors most affecting whether the golf club took up social media was the skill of the officers that ran the club. It was expected that a technology office would exist in order to update the website. It was not expected that officers with a particular portfolio would update the parts of the website within their own remit. Understandably, systems like WordPress were deemed complex, but even Facebook was updated by an individual rather than the officers concerned. The study concludes that increasing digital literacy will be essential to making social media use common in golf clubs and potentially any social or recreational group

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2016). An evaluation of social media use in a golf club. The 17th International Conference on Internet Computing and Internet of Things (ICOMP’16), 25-28 July 2016, Las Vegas, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/social-media-use-in-a-golf-club.pdf

An investigation into the extent and limitations of the GROW model for coaching and mentoring online: Towards ‘prosthetic learning’

An investigation into the extent and limitations of the GROW model for coaching and mentoring online: Towards ‘prosthetic learning’

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Coaching and mentoring have many commonalities, but can also be seen to be different. The aim of coaching is to help a person transform being where they are to where they want to go, which may be on a path that has not yet been trodden. Mentoring is a one-to-one communication between a mentor who has “been there and done that” and a mentee who wants ‘learn the ropes.’ This paper looks at how these practices can be enabled online – through Virtual Coaches – and the extent and limitations of the GROW model for online coaching and mentoring. It finds that the GROW model is limited in what it can do, and that it needs to be extended to consider factors beyond goals, realities, options and will. It is suggested that ‘engage’ and ‘routinize’ be added to create a new model called ‘GROWER.’ An extension of the M-MARS model making it M-REAMS (i.e. Methods, Rules, Enmities, Amities, Memes, Strategies) is proposed for an ethnomethodological approach to reflective learning. The paper concludes that Virtual Coaches can provide benefits in terms of enhanced mentoring and coaching relationships.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). An investigation into the extent and limitations of the GROW model for coaching and mentoring online: Towards ‘prosthetic learning.’ The 2015 International Conference on e-Learning, e-Business, Enterprise Information Systems, and e-Government (July 27-30, 2015, Las Vegas, USA). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/extent-and-limitations-of-grow-model-for-coaching-and-mentoring-online.pdf

Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews

Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Designing an effective organisational architecture for an undertaking can be considered essential to its success. The way an organisation is designed – or otherwise appears to its workers – will affect the extent to which those workers associated with it can be effective at their jobs. This chapter undertakes a case study using Big Data from a project called “QPress” that was run by an organisation that is based around contingent working and inter-professionalism. Important things drawn from the data collected from the study include the importance of the Cloud to distance working, such as teleworking; the identity of the organisation and how workers relate to it; as well as what factors assist or inhibit worker motivation. The study concludes that the organisational structure of the organisation investigated – where different firms perform different tasks could be seen as best practice in supporting inter-professional environments.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews. The International Conference on Information and Knowledge Engineering (IKE’15).

Private Lives or Public Property?: The impact of the Leveson Inquiry on Internet security and privacy in the European Union

Private Lives or Public Property?: The impact of the Leveson Inquiry on Internet security and privacy in the European Union

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The biggest story in the newspapers of 2012 probably made it into the Leveson Inquiry. This celebrity infested public inquiry intended to be the basis on which the press would be reformed to perform its role as information sources that scrutinise those with power more effectively. Leveson considered issues such as phone hacking and the distribution of private information online. The law is less clear since the publication of the Leveson Inquiry. This paper, therefore, explores the role that European Union law in the areas of property and privacy has on the way the media operates to affect security and privacy. This is achieved through exploring the data security and privacy issues surrounding the British Royal Family, where such issues came to the forefront following the exposure of explicit photographs of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, William Wales and Kate Middleton, and also those of Harry Wales.

Viewing Robin Hood and Anonymous as embodiments of non-conformity: A comparative analysis of media-texts used for provoking thoughts of protest, disobedience and idealism

Viewing Robin Hood and Anonymous as embodiments of non-conformity: A comparative analysis of media-texts used for provoking thoughts of protest, disobedience and idealism

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The truth surrounding the existence and origin of Robin Hood has evaded scholars from multiple disciplines for centuries. Robin Hood has been linked to persons or characters in court rolls, plays and other documented references. Some of the oldest records of this infamous and elusive personality include the ballads. These are not however the only media texts referring to Robin Hood, as he has featured in films, TV series, music and video games also. Akin to Robin Hood are the protest movement Anonymous. A group of hacktivists, representing modern day bandits, the comparisons between Robin Hood and Anonymous are endless. This paper examines media-texts relating to Robin Hood in a critical manner and proposes that he exists not as a person but as a metaphor for free speech and anti-establishment sentiment, much in the same way that Anonymous is used today. The paper explores how Robin Hood has been used by the peasants and aristocracy alike to reflect their ideas and ideals relating to the establishment, as a fairy tale, an antidote to economic depressions and for the romanticism associated with the legend. This is compared and contrasted with the same uses of Anonymous, including the ‘Guy Fawkes mask’ that is like Robin’s hood. The paper concludes that even if it is the case that Robin Hood exists only as a metaphor, as Anonymous does to media consumers, it still needs to be established why the rhymes were of ‘Robin Hood’ and not another name or concept.

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Citation

  • Jonathan Bishop (2014). Viewing Robin Hood and Anonymous as embodiments of non-conformity: A comparative analysis of media-texts used for provoking thoughts of protest, disobedience and idealism. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 1(2), pp.29-51

‘U r Bias Love:’ Using ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ as forensic linguistic means to annotate Twitter and newsblog comments for the purpose of multimedia forensics

‘U r Bias Love:’ Using ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ as forensic linguistic means to annotate Twitter and newsblog comments for the purpose of multimedia forensics

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The mass adoption of social media has brought with it the most undesirable aspects of human nature, namely the need to abuse one’s fellow kind for sometimes difficult to understand reasons. There has been severe pressure on law enforcement agencies to respond to this Internet abuse, commonly called Internet trolling. Equally, there has been demands made of social media companies to better police the content on their platforms. There is also the option of civil action for those who have been targeted by the ‘trolls’ who post the abusive comments. This paper suggests understanding UK case law in relation to Internet trolling and cyber-harassment should be done through the prism of the French legal concepts of bleasure (i.e. blessure) and motif. The paper provides a framework for those involved in multimedia forensics to abstract information from identified abusive content (i.e. motifs) to determine whether it would be reasonable to say that such messages harmed a person (i.e. caused a bleasure). Using a corpus linguistics approach, the paper identifies abusive posts made against prominent women public figures on Twitter and newsblogs in the last three years, namely Sally Bercow, Caroline Criado-Perez, Esther McVay and Salma Yaqoob. The paper finds that it is possible to systematically abstract data from social media platforms that both show that an offence has happened (i.e. actus reus, motif), that a person has been harmed (i.e. malum reus, bleasure), and whether it has occurred, or is likely to occur, over a longer period of time (i.e. pertinax reus). This can be done using ‘interface cues’ in the form of authority cues and bandwagon cues, which need to rely on an effective corpus of key terms to be useful.

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). ‘U r Bias Love:’ using ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ as forensic linguistic means to annotate Twitter and newsblog comments for the purpose of multimedia forensics. The 11th International Conference on Web Based Communities and Social Media 2014, Lisbon, Portugal, 17–19 July 2014. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/ur-bias-love-using-bleasure-and-motif-as-forensic-linguistic-means-to-annotate-twitter-and-newsblog-comments-for-the-purpose-of-multimedia-forensics.pdf

Using the concepts of ‘forensic linguistics,’ ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ to enhance multimedia forensic evidence collection

Using the concepts of ‘forensic linguistics,’ ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ to enhance multimedia forensic evidence collection

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling has become more widely adopted as a term to describe a range of data misuse and Internet abuse offences. To date there has been no coherent means to interpret online postings for the purpose of forensic collating and reporting of evidence. This paper proposes to use the terms of bleasure and motif, used in French law, in order to classify Internet trolling postings according to the extent their have harmed people (i.e. malum reus) and the extent to which it can be proved such bleasures show actus reus through treating them as motifs as one would in French law. Through investigating the posting of sex-related trolling messages sent to and relating to women on YouTube the study proposes a framework for classifying these messages. These chauvinistic messages are often related to rape, so the paper aims to help crime investigators use multimedia forensics to more easy collect and use evidence in cases of Internet trolling.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Using the concepts of ‘forensic linguistics,’ ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ to enhance multimedia forensic evidence collection. The 2014 International Conference on Security and Management (SAM’14), Monte Carlo Resort , in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. 21-24 July 2014. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/using-the-concepts-of-forensic-linguistics-bleasure-and-motif-to-enhance-multimedia-forensic-evidence-collection.pdf

Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization  for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online

Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization  for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Chatroom Bobs, which derived from the concept of ‘Uncle Bob’ being a name for a less than responsible family man, are characterised by being online community users driven by seeking out satisfaction for their ‘urgeances’ (or biological drives). Some of these are akin to the ‘office loser’ who tries to impress others but is despised, others have more ulterior motives for sexual satisfaction. This paper presents an intervention – called MEDIAT – which uses TAGTeach to retrain people who are sexually damaged by society and demonstrate impairment in how they interact with others. The paper presents an equation for measuring such ‘social orientation impairment’ as a reflection of its relationship to serotonergic and dopaminergic activity in the prefrontal cortex as a result of differences in ‘Neuro-response plasticity’. The paper concludes that by using MEDIAT to reverse dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity caused by traumatic experience can lead to increased constructive participation in online and other environments.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online. In: 13th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BIOCOMP’12), 16-19 July 2012, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/taming-the-chatroom-bob-the-role-of-brain-computer-interfaces-that-manipulate-prefrontal-cortex-optimization-for-increasing-participation-of-victims-of-traumatic-sex-and-other-abuse-online.pdf

Tackling Internet abuse in Great Britain: Towards a framework for classifying severities of ‘flame trolling’

Tackling Internet abuse in Great Britain: Towards a framework for classifying severities of ‘flame trolling’

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

While trolling has existed as a term since the 1990s and as a reality even earlier there has been an exponential increase in the prevalence of the abusive kind – ‘flame trolling’. Mistakenly the media calls these flame trollers, ‘trolls’, when in fact there are more often than not ‘Snerts’ and ‘E-Vengers’. The justice system in Great Britain has taken a sporadic approach to dealing with flame trolling, and the wide range of legislation that has existed since the 1980s has no strategic method to assign its usage on the basis of the nature of the flame trolling as its use often depends on the whim of different police forces. This paper hopes to change this. After a brief presentation of the background of Internet trolling in Great Britain and in general a new framework is presented. This allows prosecutors to easily classify flame trolling based on the facts of the case and pick the appropriate level based on the severity.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Tackling Internet abuse in Great Britain: Towards a framework for classifying severities of ‘flame trolling’. The 11th International Conference on Security and Management (SAM’12), 16-19 July 2012, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/tackling-internet-abuse-in-great-britain-towards-a-framework-for-classifying-severities-of-flame-trolling.pdf

The Persuasive and Assistive Interaction Extension (PAIX): A position paper on using gamified behavior management systems for reducing flame trolling in schools based on Classroom 2.0

The Persuasive and Assistive Interaction Extension (PAIX): A position paper on using gamified behavior management systems for reducing flame trolling in schools based on Classroom 2.0

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling that takes the form of cyberbullying is emerging as a significant problem for any administrator of a networked computer environment. This is also the case in Classroom 2.0 classrooms where technologies like the circle of friends has not been implemented or otherwise where there is no current moderation or monitoring of activity of the school students using the system. The paper presents a system called Paix – The Persuasive and Assistive Interaction Extension (Paix) for assisting with this problem.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2012). The Persuasive and Assistive Interaction Extension (PAIX): A position paper on using gamified behavior management systems for reducing flame trolling in schools based on Classroom 2.0. The 13th International Conference on Internet Computing (ICOMP’12). 16-19 July, 2012, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-persuasive-and-assistive-interaction-extension-paix-a-position-paper-on-using-gamified-behavior-management-systems-for-reducing-flame-trolling-in-schools-based-on-classroom-2-0.pdf