Glamorgan Summer School 2016

This tutorial will help you know the major developments of historical interest in Taf Ely, including by finding information on three sites of historical interest, finding the meaning of terms used in context, and by looking up the meaning of six words used in research materials. During the tutorial you will be able to design a portfolio of information relating to sites of interest, and contribute to collecting and collating information to put in a portfolio.

Part I – Be able to design a portfolio of information relating to sites of interest

I.I – Contribute to collecting and collating information to put in a portfolio

Using the range of sources below, create a portfolio of images and other materials that reflect your ideas on the past, present and future of the following localities and the ways in which you think they have played a part in war, peace, and conflict resolution.

  • Gilfach Goch
  • Llantrisant
  • Llantwit Fardre
  • Nantgarw
  • Pontypridd
  • Taffs Well
  • Tonyrefail
  • Ynysybwl

Discuss how you have contributed to the collecting and collating of information to put in a portfolio using the discussion board at this link.

Part II – Know the major developments of historical interest in the local area

II.I – Find information on three sites of historical interest

Discuss using this board the three sites of historical interest that you identify below.

II.I.I – Industrial and Agricultural

Consider issues such as place names, labour forces as well as food and farming.

Select media on industry and agriculture:
Or search for media on place names, labour forces as well as food and farming:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on place names, labour forces as well as food and farming.
II.I.II – Landscape and Buildings

Consider issues such as landscape history, domestic buildings, historic churches, courts, health facilities, and schools.

Select media on landscape and buildings:
Or search for media on landscape history, domestic buildings, historic churches, courts, health facilities, and schools.


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on landscape history, domestic buildings, historic churches, courts, health facilities, and schools:
II.I.II – Community and Governance

Consider issues such as education, popular culture, folklore, customs, civic ritual, central and local government, policing and law and order.

Select media on community and governance:
Or search for media on education, popular culture, folklore, customs, civic ritual, central and local government, policing and law and order:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on education, popular culture, folklore, customs, civic ritual, central and local government, policing and law and order.

I.II – Find the meaning of terms used in context

Discuss using this board the meaning of the five terms below in the context you find them.

I.II.I – War

Consider why war happens and what the alternatives to war can be. For example, can peace congresses or other forms of diplomacy prevent war, or is it the case that in order to get peace that war needs to happen?

Select media on war:
Or search for media on war:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on war.
I.II.II – Peace

Consider whether war is always the opposite of peace, and how peace can occur during wars. For example, does fellowship between a nation’s citizens continue during periods where their countries are at war with one another?

Select media on peace:
Or search for media on peace:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on peace.
I.II.III – Past

Consider your local area’s past and what is important about this. For example has the community learned from its past mistakes, or is there anything else about the community’s past that still has relevance today?

Select media on the past:

Or search for media on the past:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on the past.
I.II.IV – Present

Consider what it happening at the moment in your local area. For example, are you able to enjoy the things you want to enjoy with people you like, or are there things about it you do not like and wish would not happen?

Select media on the present day:
Or search for media on the present:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on the present.
I.II.V – Future

Consider what you would like your local area to be like in the future. For example, are there things about it you want to change, things you want to keep, or things that no one has thought of or done, which you would like to happen?

Select media on the future:
Or search for media on the future:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on the future.

I.III – Look up the meaning of six words used in research materials

Discuss using this board the six words below.

Consider the following six words:

  1. Heritage
  2. Place
  3. Community
  4. Class
  5. Culture
  6. Economy
I.III.I – Heritage

Consider the meaning of the word heritage.

Select information on the word heritage:
Or search for information on the word heritage:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on heritage.
I.III.II – Place

Consider the meaning of the word place.

Select information on the word place:
Or search for information on the word place:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on the word place.
I.III.III – Community

Consider the meaning of the word community.

Select information on the word community:
Or search for information on the word community:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on the word community.
I.III.IV – Class

Consider the meaning of the word class.

Select information on the word class.
Or search for information on the word class:

I.III.IV – Culture

Consider the meaning of the word culture.

Select information on the word culture:
Or search for information on the word culture:

I.III.V – Economy

Consider the meaning of the word economy.

Select information on the word economy:
Or search for information on the word economy:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on the word economy.

I.IV – Look up the meaning of four factors that change throughout history

Discuss using this board the four factors below.

Consider the following four factors that change throughout history:

  1. The Environment
  2. Money and Possessions
  3. Family and Friends
  4. Activities and Leisure
I.IV.I – The Environment

Consider how the environment has changed throughout history.

Select information on the environment throughout history
Or search for information on the environment throughout history:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on the environment.
I.IV.II – Money and Possessions

Consider how access to money and possessions has changed throughout history.

Select information on money and possessions throughout history:
Or search for information on money and possessions throughout history:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on the history of money and possessions.
I.IV.III – Family and Friends

Consider how who forms part of someone family or circle of friends has changed throughout history.

Select information on family and friends throughout history:
Or search for information on the history of family and friends:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on the history of family and friends.
I.IV.IV – Activities and Leisure

Consider how access to activities and leisures has changed throughout history.

Select information on activities and leisure throughout history:
Or search for information on activities and leisure:


Or ask your tutor for visual aides on activities and leisure throughout history.

Magna Carta

Magna Carta Libertatum (Latin for “the Great Charter of the Liberties”), commonly called Magna Carta (also Magna Charta; “(the) Great Charter”), is a charter agreed to by King John of England at Runnymede, near Windsor, on 15 June 1215.

John met the rebel leaders at Runnymede, a water-meadow on the south bank of the River Thames, on 10 June 1215. Runnymede was a traditional place for assemblies, but it was also located on neutral ground between the royal fortress of Windsor Castle and the rebel base at Staines, and offered both sides the security of a rendezvous where they were unlikely to find themselves at a military disadvantage. Here the rebels presented John with their draft demands for reform, the ‘Articles of the Barons’.

First drafted by the Archbishop of Canterbury to make peace between the unpopular King and a group of rebel barons, it promised the protection of church rights, protection for the barons from illegal imprisonment, access to swift justice, and limitations on feudal payments to the Crown, to be implemented through a council of 25 barons.

Neither side stood behind their commitments, and the charter was annulled by Pope Innocent III, leading to the First Barons’ War. After John’s death, the regency government of his young son, Henry III, reissued the document in 1216, stripped of some of its more radical content, in an unsuccessful bid to build political support for their cause.

At the end of the war in 1217, it formed part of the peace treaty agreed at Lambeth, where the document acquired the name Magna Carta, to distinguish it from the smaller Charter of the Forest which was issued at the same time. Short of funds, Henry reissued the charter again in 1225 in exchange for a grant of new taxes; his son, Edward I, repeated the exercise in 1297, this time confirming it as part of England’s statute law.

The charter became part of English political life and was typically renewed by each monarch in turn, although as time went by and the fledgling English Parliament passed new laws, it lost some of its practical significance. At the end of the 16th century there was an upsurge in interest in Magna Carta.

Lawyers and historians at the time believed that there was an ancient English constitution, going back to the days of the Anglo-Saxons, that protected individual English freedoms. They argued that the Norman invasion of 1066 had overthrown these rights, and that Magna Carta had been a popular attempt to restore them, making the charter an essential foundation for the contemporary powers of Parliament and legal principles such as habeas corpus.

Although this historical account was badly flawed, jurists such as Sir Edward Coke used Magna Carta extensively in the early 17th century, arguing against the divine right of kings propounded by the Stuart monarchs. Both James I and his son Charles I attempted to suppress the discussion of Magna Carta, until the issue was curtailed by the English Civil War of the 1640s and the execution of Charles. The political myth of Magna Carta and its protection of ancient personal liberties persisted after the Glorious Revolution of 1688 until well into the 19th century. It influenced the early American colonists in the Thirteen Colonies and the formation of the American Constitution in 1787, which became the supreme law of the land in the new republic of the United States.

Research by Victorian historians showed that the original 1215 charter had concerned the medieval relationship between the monarch and the barons, rather than the rights of ordinary people, but the charter remained a powerful, iconic document, even after almost all of its content was repealed from the statute books in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Magna Carta still forms an important symbol of liberty today, often cited by politicians and campaigners, and is held in great respect by the British and American legal communities, Lord Denning describing it as “the greatest constitutional document of all times – the foundation of the freedom of the individual against the arbitrary authority of the despot”.

In the 21st century, four exemplifications of the original 1215 charter remain in existence, held by the British Library and the cathedrals of Lincoln and Salisbury. There are also a handful of the subsequent charters in public and private ownership, including copies of the 1297 charter in both the United States and Australia. The original charters were written on parchment sheets using quill pens, in heavily abbreviated medieval Latin, which was the convention for legal documents at that time. Each was sealed with the royal great seal (made of beeswax and resin sealing wax): very few of the seals have survived.

Although scholars refer to the 63 numbered “clauses” of Magna Carta, this is a modern system of numbering, introduced by Sir William Blackstone in 1759; the original charter formed a single, long unbroken text. The four original 1215 charters were displayed together at the British Library for one day, 3 February 2015, to mark the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta.

Successful first day at Glamorgan Summer School

The first day of the Glamorgan Summer School 2016 was a huge success.

Young people came together in Treforest to learn about the history of the Pontypridd and Ynysybwl & Coed-y-Cwm communities and to express those ideas through collages.

One of the participants said the workshops were an eye opener to things she had not been taught at school. “I liked looking at the Davy Lamp and learning how miners kept safe,” said Seren Jenkins. “I am looking forward to the next session.

Participants in the Pontypridd, Ysysybwl and Coed-y-Cwm workshop of the Glamorgan Summer School.
ART ACTION: Participants in the Pontypridd, Ysysybwl and Coed-y-Cwm workshop of the Glamorgan Summer School. Courtesy: Jonathan Bishop Limited.

Another participant, Cerys Jenkins, said that she liked how friendly the class was. “I liked that everyone got along,” she said. “Everyone had a good time and I learned new things.

The next session of the Emotivate Project is at 10AM on Tuesday 16 August 2016 at pel Farm Community Resource Centre in Tonyrefail. Further information can be found on the project’s website at www.emotivate.org.uk or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/gblemotivate/

Owen Smith ‘introduced’ to BBC by own father

Owen Smith’s job at the BBC was as a result of being introduced to the corporation by his father, it has been alleged by Press Gang.

Criticisms were levied at the BBC that claims Owen Smith got a job there and his father Dai Smith did the same year implied that he got the job before his father did, when that was not the case as his father was already established at the corporation.

It has been alleged that Owen Smith was introduced to the BBC by his father, Dai Smith.
LOOK MAM I’M ON TV: It has been alleged that Owen Smith was introduced to the BBC by his father, Dai Smith. Courtesy: Obtained from YouTube.

The Press Gang website raised concerns with the BBC asking for them to change the statement on their website, because in their view Owen Smith only got the job at the BBC due to nepotism. They also alleged that he had not been a member of the Labour Party for 30 years as he claimed, because in their view he only started getting interested in politics in his 30s.

Press Gang have now demanded that Owen Smith answer the following three questions:

  1. If he’s ever been a member of the National Union of Journalists;
  2. If he’s been a member of the Labour Party continuously since he joined at the age of 16; and
  3. If he will, as Jeremy Corbyn has done, make his tax returns public.

Trolls and Bullies

Shortly after the death of Batley and Spen’s MP, Jo Cox, I wrote an article noting female colleagues in the Houses of Parliament are suffering online threats, many of which are deeply offensive with sexual undertones. I observed there is a particular kind of person that hates women in authority; this prejudice is not confined to men.

Misogynistic online bullying is not, of course, confined to Members of Parliament. Many women in the public eye, from historian Mary Beard to Caroline Criado Perez, who campaigned for Jane Austen to be on a banknote, to school children have been affected. Bullying of any kind, whether online or offline, is absolutely unacceptable and I completely agree with the Minister for Women and Equalities that there is absolutely no place for misogyny or trolling in our society.

I welcome therefore that the Government has set up the Stop Online Abuse website that offers practical advice, with a focus on LGB&T people, including on social media. This excellent new resource also gives information on how to complain about sexism and bullying on websites, social media sites and in the press and advertising.

It is also important to educate young people against this sort of bullying in the first place, to ensure they are robust and resilient if they come across unwanted images or cyberbullying. A range of websites help children and their parents discuss these issues, and the Government has invested £3.85 million in a second phase of the ‘This is Abuse’ campaign called Disrespect Nobody, which challenges young people to rethink their views on abuse and consent in relationships.

What is illegal offline is illegal online. I welcome recent developments, such as a Twitter director saying he thought the company was doing better on dealing with trolls, but I was glad that the site also recognises more must be done.

Further information

Eric Pickles is a British Conservative Party politician and Member of Parliament for Brentwood and Ongar.

Owen Smith got election data from delayed project

Owen Smith has attempted to discredit Jeremy Corbyn’s claim that Labour was ahead in the polls until the attempts to oust him began – by using aggregated data from a voluntary project, which two years behind schedule.

In a debate with Jeremy Corbyn, Owen Smith quoted data from Britain Elects, which on their own website admit they are not as up-to-date as planned. It says on their website:

Our site, two years behind schedule, is currently under construction, but progress is being made! Slowly. It will hopefully be live within the next few months, although please don’t put that in your diary. If you wish to get in touch in the meantime, be it data, media or somesuch requests you can contact us on Twitter or throw us on email on queries@britainelects.com. We’ll aim to get back to you as soon as possible, but as we’re currently an entirely voluntary service, expect a delay by up to a few days.

Edward Parker, a supporter of Owen Smith, attempted to justify Owen Smith’s choice of data. “[I]t’s the average poll of polls, put together by Britain Elects,” he said. “[A]lso we haven’t been ahead in an opinion poll since April.

Owen Smith uses aggregated data from delayed project to attempt to discredit Jeremy Corbyn.
WHAT WAS STAT AGAIN?: Owen Smith uses aggregated data from delayed project to attempt to discredit Jeremy Corbyn. Courtesy: Obtained from britainelects.com

Jonathan Bishop, a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society, says the method used by Britain Elects is suspect. “In simplest terms, a thousand flies does not make dog crap good,” he said. “Crocels Research predicted the Welsh Assembly results accurately by using a linear regression of the past performance of the parties when they contested elections against each other.
Aggregating different polls does nothing to help improve the statistical significance of the data, so if this is the only way Owen Smith can attempt to discredit Jeremy Corbyn then we should be asking whether his £200bn New Deal figures add up also.
At Crocels Base we have been looking into what Owen Smith has said in the past and what he is saying now, and whilst he has a good record of announcing big budget projects, he has never been in a position to actual implement them.

Jess Phillips criticises selection of mayoral candidates on merit because they are men

The selection of Labour’s candidates for the 2017 mayoral elections has been criticised by Jess Phillips MP, because they are filled by prominent local politicians who happen to be men.

Jess Phillips was not her constituency’s first choice of parliamentary candidate, as she only got selected for Birmingham Yardley because an all-women shortlist was imposed on local members.

Jess Phillips MP
ALTERNATE: Jess Phillips MP only became an MP because men were barred from standing for nomination as Labour candidates. Courtesy: Birmingham Mail.

Now Jess Phillips is criticising Jeremy Corbyn for not allowing other incompetent people to have the same chances she has had to get elected for the only reason being that they are women. “He told me he was a feminist. I suppose feminism is out of the window when your brothers in arms want the jobs,” she raged about Jeremy Corbyn. “The Labour party is becoming a movement of words not deeds,” she said in anger about the fact that preferred candidates were being chosen on merit rather than alternates like herself being imposed.

The Liverpool mayoral candidate is Steve Rotheram, who is a former Lord Mayor of Liverpool and current Member of Parliament for Liverpool Walton. Andy Burnham is the Member of Parliament for Leigh in Manchester with a distinguished ministerial career in government and opposition, and will be Labour’s candidate for mayor of Greater Manchester.

The Labour Party has used all-women-shortlists as a crude way to get more women into public office. This has meant that women who lack the ability to perform in public office have got in by the back door. Some have questioned Labour’s approach, especially following the appointment of Theresa May as the second woman prime minister, chosen on merit by her fellow MPs after a distinguished career in both opposition and government. Theresa May is a Conservative, meaning the only women Prime Ministers in the United Kingdom have been members of the Conservative Party, with the first being Margaret Thatcher.

Hedge fund strategist heading Owen Smith’s campaign

A hedge fund strategist is the man behind Owen Smith’s bid to become leader of the Labour Party it has been revealed.

Alex Barros-Curtis is the only director of Owen2016 Campaign Limited, which is the corporation organising the Pontypridd MP’s campaign to oust Jeremy Corbyn as Labour Leader.

Alex Barros-Curtis is the director of Owen2016 Campaign Limited.
HEDGING HIS BETS: Alex Barros-Curtis is the director of Owen2016 Campaign Limited. Courtesy: Obtained from Twitter

During the period following Owen Smith moving from Surrey to Llantrisant when he became MP for Pontypridd and mounting his re-election bid for the Pontypridd constituency, Alex Barros-Curtis worked in the financial services industry for Allen & Overy. Alex Barros-Curtis describes his experience as follows:

Associate in the Derivatives and Structured Finance (DSF) Department at Allen & Overy, advising buy-side and sell-side market participants on a wide range of derivatives and structured finance matters. During my time in the DSF Department, I worked on a broad range of transactions, including interest rate and FX transactions and the hedging of complex secured financing arrangements. I also advised on the regulatory requirements arising in the context of such transactions, in particular those requirements relating to the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR). Alongside transactional matters, I advised a range of institutions on the impact of EMIR and associated regulations, with a particular focus on the implementation of procedures to comply with risk mitigation and reporting obligations.

Alex Barros-Curtis claims his skills as “limited proficiency” in French, capital markets, structured finance, hedging, interest rate hedging, and legal writing.

Musicians Union backlash over Owen Smith endorsement

The Executive Committee of the Musicians Union is facing a backlash over its decision to support Owen Smith to be leader of the Labour Party without consulting members.

A letter of petition organised by musician, Dr Dave Camlin of Workington in Cumbria, has the support of 22 members. The proposed motion reads:

We, the undersigned members of the MU, move that the decision by the Musicians’ Union Executive Committee on 5th August 2016 to endorse Owen Smith MP in the contest for leader of the Labour Party is not necessarily representative of the views of MU members. Owing to the strength of feeling among the membership on this issue, we therefore propose that support for Owen Smith be withdrawn immediately, and the decision on who to support in the contest for leader of the Labour Party be suspended until such time as a ballot of all MU members’ views on the subject can be undertaken.

Musicians Union members organise an emergency motion to reverse the decision of its Executive Committee to support Owen Smith.
MC HAMMERED: Musicians Union members organise an emergency motion to reverse the decision of its Executive Committee to support Owen Smith. Courtesy: Obtained from Independent.co.uk

Dr Camlin explained his reasons for organising the emergency motion. “Many MU members were disappointed by the MU Executive Committee’s decision to endorse Owen Smith in the Labour leadership contest, as they didn’t feel they had been consulted on the matter, and many support Jeremy Corbyn,” he said. “The strength of feeling was evident by the huge number of critical posts on the MU Facebook page. However, because the MU is also a democratic institution, a number of members united to propose a motion to the EC to reverse the decision.
Hopefully this is a case of democracy in action – we hope that the EC will recognise the controversial and unrepresentative nature of their decision, and will want to withdraw support for Owen Smith immediately until they’ve had a chance to properly consult their members on the matter.
The ball is in their court, and we hope they do the right thing.

Prominent Musicians Union Member, Pontypridd Assembly Member Mick Antoniw, who shares the same constituency boundary as Owen Smith, has refused to confirm who he is backing in the race, but is known to have supported Jeremy Corbyn previously.

University to take no action over ‘racism’ against academic

A university’s police department has said it will be taking no action following what is believed to be one of its former students posting racist remarks using an email address associated with the university.

California State University Long Beach is at the centre of a racism row following Corporal Christopher Brown justifying racism against a white academic as free speech.
RACISM ROW: California State University Long Beach is at the centre of a racism row following Corporal Christopher Brown justifying racism against a white academic as free speech. Courtesy: Wikimedia Foundation.

Corporal Christopher Brown of the California State University Long Beach’s Police Department said that the racist remarks describing a white academic as “White trash” did not break the law by someone pertaining to be former student Eric Fisher. “I would agree his comment is disparaging, but I detect no threat or violation of law,” said Corporal Christopher Brown. “Mr. Fisher, if that is his real name, has the freedom under the 1st Amendment of the US Constitution to express his views.
Since he is not affiliated with the University itself, there is no recourse for student conduct and discipline.